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Tasmanian Biosecurity Advisories

Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment

Latest Advisories

Subscribing to get DPIPWE’s Biosecurity Advisories is the best way you can keep yourself up-to-date and fully informed about Tasmanian biosecurity issues. Our Advisories cover topics such as changes or proposed changes to Tasmania’s import regulations, animal health and welfare, plant health, forthcoming regulation reviews and opportunities for public comment, new or emerging pest/disease risks and a range of other matters related to Tasmania’s biosecurity.


88 advisories found for Wildlife.
 

Biosecurity Advisory 4/2020 -​ Amendments to Import Requirement 2 – Disinfestation with Methyl Bromide for fruit fly host produce

After the recent detection of fruit fly larvae in host produce at the Tasmanian border by biosecurity officers, Biosecurity Tasmania has made some amendments to Import Requirement 2 – Disinfestation with Methyl Bromide (IR2). 

These amendments were developed in partnership with Agriculture Victoria with the same changes being introduced into the Victorian Interstate Certification Assurance arrangement ICA-04 Fumigation with Methyl Bromide operational protocol. 

The amendments will take effect at 12:01am on Tuesday 10 March 2020.

The amendments include:
  • Pre-treatment inspections of ‘high risk’ commodities: mangoes, stone fruit and chillies;
  • Fumigation of high risk commodities in a separate fumigation chamber to any other fruit fly host produce; and
  • Administrative requirements to include the recording of fumigation chamber number against fumigated lots on certification.
Biosecurity Tasmania will only accept certification under ICA-04 protocols that align with the amended IR2 (effectively currently limited to Victorian accredited businesses).
You can find the amended IR2 on the DPIPWE website​. Please note that the version of IR2 contained in the Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmania (Edition 2020) PDF is therefore no longer valid as of 10 March 2020.

(6/3/2020)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 3/2020 -​ Fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) in Australia

Fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) has been detected on the northern Queensland mainland and in the Torres Strait islands. 

Due to the pest’s reproductive capacity, ability to fly long distances and wide host range, combined with the remoteness and spread of known infestations, the national Consultative Committee on Emergency Plant Pests (CCEPP) has met and has made recommendations to the National Management Group it is not technically feasible to eradicate the pest.

Fall armyworm affects more than 350 host crops.  Many of these hosts are important cropping species (i.e. vegetables, fruit, and cereals) that are widely traded for retail food supply e.g. tomatoes, potatoes, peppers, corn, rice, sorghum, millet, sugarcane, rye and wheat.  

There are species of Spodoptera already present in Australia, which can look similar to fall armyworm.​

What is the risk for Tasmania? 

As a precautionary measure, Biosecurity Tasmania has declared fall armyworm a pest under the Plant Quarantine Act 1997. This means that in the event it is intercepted in traded plants or plant products at the border, regulatory intervention can be undertaken.

Fall armyworm is native to tropical and subtropical regions of the Americas and is most likely found in warm, moist regions where it thrives.

The fall armyworm is not likely to thrive in the cool temperate Tasmanian climate and the current assessment is that it is unlikely to establish permanent populations here.

Due to the ability of the fall armyworm to fly long distances it may migrate into Tasmania from interstate in the future.  However, such migrations are likely to be seasonal and populations are likely to die back in the cooler seasons. 

Biosecurity Tasmania will identify any suspected fall armyworm specimens at no cost. Contact Biosecurity Tasmania 03 6165 3777.

Further information about fall armyworm is available on the Queensland Government website.​

(28/2/2020)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 2/2020 - An important reminder regarding requirements for the importation of cattle into Tasmania.


Biosecurity Tasmania would like to remind importers that the following conditions exist in relation to the importation of cattle into Tasmania.

  • The shipment must be accompanied by a completed:
  • The cattle must be identified with a National Livestock Identification System (NLIS) identification device. 
  • The cattle must be inspected by the owner or person in charge within 7 days prior to movement to Tasmania, and be found free of signs of disease.
  • The cattle must not be known or suspected of being infected with, or exposed to a List A or List B disease (https://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/animal-biosecurity/animal-health/notifiable-animal-diseases), other than Johne's Disease, within 42 days prior to movement to Tasmania commencing.  Please note - Enzootic Bovine Leucosis (EBL) remains a list B notifiable disease in Tasmania.
  • The herd of origin must not be subject to any animal movement restrictions, other than restrictions for Bovine Johne's Disease.
  • Cattle that are infected or suspected of being infected with Johne’s disease may be introduced into Tasmania providing the purchaser or recipient has been advised that the cattle are infected or suspected of being infected with Johne’s Disease.
  • The owner or person in charge of the animals in the exporting State or Territory must certify within 7 days prior to movement to Tasmania that, to the best of their knowledge, all the above conditions have been met. 
  • A Stock Inspector or Government Veterinary Officer in the state of origin must certify that after due enquiry, they have no reason to doubt the above 'owner declaration'. 
  • The importer must transfer NLIS numbers of these cattle on the NLIS database within seven (7) days of arrival in Tasmania.
Application to the Chief Veterinary Officer for a Special Authority to import cattle into Tasmania may be made for cattle not meeting the above requirements (please contact: AnimalDisease.Enquiries@dpipwe.tas.gov.au​).
Further information regarding livestock importation to Tasmania is available at https://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/biosecurity/importing-animals 

(17/1/2020)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 1/2020 -​ Tasmania is Queensland fruit fly free – please help us keep it that way

Summer is the peak time for fruit fly activity on mainland Australia and a time of increased risk for Tasmania.

While Biosecurity Tasmania has strict controls in place aimed at preventing fruit fly from getting into Tasmania, we ask everybody to remain vigilant for any signs of fruit fly.

Fruit fly larvae look similar to blowfly maggots and could be found in fruit that you bought from the supermarket or from fruit in your backyard.

Queensland fruit flies lay eggs in maturing and ripe fruit on trees and sometimes in fallen fruit. The maggots (larvae) hatch and the fruit is destroyed by the feeding maggots and by associated fruit decay. Queensland fruit flies can lay eggs in a wide range of fruit, fruiting vegetables and native fruiting plants.

Evidence of Queensland fruit fly activity is also sometimes observed as puncture marks (stings) in the skin of fruit. The stings are where the female fruit fly has laid her eggs.

If you see something suspect and are not sure, please report it to Biosecurity Tasmania on 03 6165 3777.

Please do not dispose of any fruit that has larvae you think might be fruit fly.  Instead place the fruit in a plastic bag or plastic container and put it in your fridge until a Biosecurity Tasmania officer can collect it.

For more information on Queensland fruit fly visit the Biosecurity Tasmania website at: www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/fruitfly

(8/1/2020)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 30/2019 - Release of the Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmania 2020 Edition & changes to the Tasmanian Biosecurity Import Requirement Database - TBIRD

Biosecurity Tasmania wishes to advise that the 2020 edition of the Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmania (PBMTas) is available as of today, 18 December 2019.

The 2020 edition incorporates a number of changes to import requirements including:

  • ​Import Requirement 2 – Fruit Fly Host Produce – Disinfestation with Methyl Bromide;
  • Import Requirement 10 – Grape Phylloxera – Hosts and Vectors;
  • ​Import Requirement 11 – Onion Smut and Iris Yellow Spot Tospovirus – Hosts and Vectors;
  • ​Import Requirement 31 – Hosts and Vectors – Citrus Canker
  • Import Requirement 37 – Plant Material and Soil for the Purposes of Laboratory Analysis or Diagnosis; and
  • Import Requirement 46 – Tomato Potato Psyllid – Hosts and Vectors.

Some of the above changes occurred during 2019 and are now incorporated into the 2020 edition.

Additionally, Parts 1 and 2 of the PBMTas have been reformatted to make it easier for importers to understand their general obligations when importing prescribed matter into Tasmania.

A more comprehensive list of all changes can be found in the section 68 notice at the front of the PBMTas 2020 edition.

Please also be advised that Biosecurity Tasmania’s up to date pest and disease listings (Regulated Quarantine Pests including List A and B pests and diseases as well as Unwanted Quarantine Pests) can be found within the PBMTas 2020 edition or from here.

In addition, the current Tasmanian Biosecurity Import Requirement Database (TBIRD) has been disabled to make way for a new and improved database of biosecurity import requirements (TBIRD v2.0). TBIRD v2.0 will include import requirements relating to plants and plant products, animal health, wildlife and invasive species.

It is anticipated that TBIRD v2.0 will be available in mid-2020.

In the meantime, Tasmania’s import requirements for prescribed matter (plants and plant products) can be accessed via the PDF version of the PBMTas 2020 edition​.

(18/12/2019)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Livestock; Marine pests; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 29/2019 - Biosecurity Advisory Committee Announced

​The Minister for Primary Industries and Water, Guy Barnett, has announced appointments to the Tasmanian Biosecurity Advisory Committee.

The selection of the Committee followed a public expression of interest process and has been formed as an independent advisory body to the Government and Minister to help guide Government strategies and policy for biosecurity matters in Tasmania.

Members appointed to the Committee include industry leaders and experts across animal and plant agriculture, fisheries, science, environment, government, tourism and other representatives - drawn from across Tasmania.

Visit the Biosecurity Tasmania website for information on the Biosecurity Act 2019 and the Committee.​ www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-act​​​

(28/11/2019)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 27/2019 - Import Risk Analysis - Pigeons and Fertile Pigeon Eggs

​A draft Import Risk Analysis (IRA) on the importation of live pigeons and their fertile eggs has been prepared by Biosecurity Tasmania.

The draft IRA is now available for public comment until 5pm Friday 3 January 2020. Public consultation is a critical component of the IRA process.

Pigeon Paramyxovirus 1 (PPMV1), the disease for which current import conditions were enacted, was detected in Tasmania in 2013. Both Pigeon Paramyxovirus 1 (PPMV1) and Pigeon rotavirus may cause a significant impact to individual pigeon owners and pigeon events. Given that these diseases are present in Tasmania, and that pigeon races across Bass Strait have recommenced, these risks are considered best managed on a flock and event basis by implementing sound biosecurity measures and/or flock vaccination under the advice of a veterinarian.

Therefore the IRA proposes that the importation into Tasmania of pigeons and their fertile eggs be amended to reflect the same requirements that have been adopted for poultry and cage birds -  that is importation without restriction, except for the requirement that imported animals appear healthy on visual inspection and be under no current movement restrictions.

Information on the IRA and how to make a submission can be found on the Biosecurity Tasmania website:

(26/11/2019)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 25/2019 - Weeds Action Fund Projects Announced

​A total of thirty four projects have been successful in obtaining funding under the Tasmanian Government's Weeds Action Fund (WAF), 'Small Grants' program. 

Weed control activities and lost agricultural production are a substantial cost to Tasmanian farmers and the Government will work closely with Mr. Ian Sauer, Chair of the Tasmanian Weeds Action Fund, to reduce the serious impact and threat of weeds across our State.

Successful projects include actions targeting serious agricultural and environmental weeds such as Paterson's curse, horehound, gorse, Spanish heath, Besom heath, African boxthorn, orange hawkweed, Parramatta grass, serrated tussock, and Chilean needle grass. 

Several projects are also targeting weed threats to wetlands, off-shore islands, such as Maatsuyker Island and islands in the Furneaux group, and weeds threatening vegetation communities such as black gum.

These projects represent the first stage of the five year Weeds Action Fund and help to ensure that landowners and the community are able to tackle in an effective way significant agricultural and environmental weeds and to reduce the cost and impact of weeds.

The Tasmanian Government Weeds Action Fund (WAF) is a ground-breaking fund with a total budget of $5 million over five years to tackle weeds that are impacting on valuable agricultural and environmental assets.

The Government is currently developing Stage 2 of the Weeds Action Fund in which the majority of the Government's $5 million commitment will roll out over the next four years.

More information on the Weeds Action Fund can be found on the Biosecurity Tasmania website.

(20/11/2019)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 24/2019 - Public comments are invited on the proposed import of the Golden lion tamarin into Tasmania

​The Wildlife Management Branch of the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment have received a submission for the Golden lion tamarin (Leontopithecus rosalia) species profile for consideration to import into Tasmania. 

Public comments are invited by 13 November 2019
  
Details of the species profile and risk assessment is available for viewing on the DPIPWE website at:  

(1/11/2019)
Categories: Freshwater pests; Invasive Species; Natural environment; Policy and Legislation; Wildlife; Livestock; Gene technology;


Biosecurity Advisory 23/2019 - Important Update: Proposed Property Identification Code (PIC) Reforms - submission date extended

MPORTANT UPDATE: The closing date for submissions of public comments on the proposed property identification code (PIC) reforms has now been extended until Friday 15 November 2019. (See Biosecurity Advisory 22/2019 for more details). Please visit the website for more information: http://www.agriculture.gov.au/…/propertyidentificationrefor…

(1/11/2019)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;

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