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Tasmanian Biosecurity Advisories

Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment

Latest Advisories

Subscribing to get DPIPWE’s Biosecurity Advisories is the best way you can keep yourself up-to-date and fully informed about Tasmanian biosecurity issues. Our Advisories cover topics such as changes or proposed changes to Tasmania’s import regulations, animal health and welfare, plant health, forthcoming regulation reviews and opportunities for public comment, new or emerging pest/disease risks and a range of other matters related to Tasmania’s biosecurity.


67 advisories found for Wildlife.
 

Biosecurity Advisory 4/2019: Tasmania’s final draft of the Biosecurity Bill 2019 is now available for public comment.

​The final draft of Tasmania’s Biosecurity Bill 2019 is now available for public comment. 

The draft Biosecurity Bill provides a simpler and more effective legal framework for the management of disease, weeds and vermin, imports of plant and animal products, and biosecurity emergencies. 

The new draft Bill will facilitate the sharing of responsibility between Government, industry and the community for biosecurity management. It will retain many of the elements of Tasmania’s existing biosecurity system, but in a modernised and consolidated form.

A draft of the Bill has been provided to key stakeholders and has been published on DPIPWE’s website. For more information, go to: https://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/about-biosecurity-tasmania/biosecurity-legislation-review/draft-biosecurity-bill​​

Feedback on the final exposure draft of the Bill can be emailed by 22 February 2019 to biosecuritybill@dpipwe.tas.gov.au​

(31/1/2019)
Categories: Wildlife; Timber imports; Seeds; Policy and Legislation; Plant pests; Plant diseases; Pasture; Natural environment; Marine pests; Livestock; Invasive Species; Horticulture; Gene technology; Freshwater pests; Cropping;


Biosecurity Advisory 1/2019 - Public comment invited on proposal to import Rose-crowned conure into Tasmania

​The Wildlife Management Branch of the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment have received a submission for the Rose-crowned conure Pyrrhura rhodocephala species profile for consideration to import into Tasmania. 

Public comments are invited by 9 January 2019.
  
Details of the species profile and risk assessment are available for viewing on the DPIPWE website at:  

For further enquiries on the import proposal please contact:

Wildlife Management Branch
DPIPWE
200 Collins Street 
GPO Box 44
HOBART TAS 7001
Phone: 03 6165 4305
Fax: 03 6173 0253

(3/1/2019)
Categories: Invasive Species; Policy and Legislation; Natural environment; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 30/2018 - Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmania (PBMTas): 2019 edition published 19 December 2018

​The 2019 edition of the Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmania (PBMTas) was published on the Biosecurity Tasmania website (www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity​) on 19 December 2018. The manual will only be published online, and will not be available in hard copy format.

The new edition of the PBMTas includes several changes to important Import Requirements (IR’s). Please note that these changes take legal effect from the date of public release, which is 19 December 2018.
 
The revised conditions and restrictions in this year’s Manual, include but are not limited to:
  • The introduction of new Import Requirements for Tomato Potato Psyllid (IR46), and Citrus Canker (IR31);
  • Revocation of IR25 - Green Snail- Vector Import Controls;
  • Significant amendments to IR1 – Fruit Fly Host Produce – Area Freedom; IR2 – Fruit Fly Host Produce – Disinfestation with Methyl Bromide; IR4 – Fruit Fly Host Produce – Disinfestation of Mango and Papaya with Heat; IR8A – Fruit Fly Host Produce – Post-harvest Treatment with Dimethoate; and IR38 – Nursery Stock;
  • Extensive update to entries in Table 2 Import Requirement Summary Table;
  • Changes in acceptance status of several Interstate Certification Assurances (ICAs) as recognised by Biosecurity Tasmania (see Section 2.18 of the Manual); and
  • Update of Tasmania’s Regulated Quarantine Pest List A & B Pests and Diseases (Appendix 1.1), and Unwanted Quarantine Pests (& Diseases) (Appendix 1.2), including the declaration of.
​In term​s of more recent plant biosecurity ‘quarantine pest’ declaration changes, besides a couple of pest name taxonomic updates, key changes have included new declarations of Citrus Canker as a Regulated Quarantine Pest (RQP), removal of Green Snail as a RQP to an Unwanted Quarantine Pest (UQP), and declaration of Cowpea Mild Mottle Virus and Giant Pine Scale as UQP’s.

The annual update of Tasmania’s Regulated Quarantine Pests (RQPs - Section 12 List A and B plant pests) was also published in the Government Gazette on Wednesday 21 November 2018. A copy of this Gazette can be accessed on the Tasmanian Government Gazette website​.
 
As in previous years the updated RQP List is included in the 2018 edition of the Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmania (PBMTas) in Appendix 1. As a reminder, a Regulated Quarantine Pest (RQP) is a pest which:
  • poses a significant threat to our primary industries and/or natural environment; and is either not present in Tasmania; or present in the State but is under some form of official control program.

(19/12/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife; Freshwater pests; Marine pests; Livestock;


Biosecurity Advisory 29/2018 - Single male Queensland fruit fly detected on Flinders Island during ongoing surveillance

​A single adult male Queensland fruit fly has been detected on Flinders Island during the ongoing surveillance program undertaken by Biosecurity Tasmania.

The detection does not affect northern Tasmania. The target date for reinstatement for the Northern Tasmanian Control Area remains 9 January 2019, subject to not detecting any fruit fly in this area.

This recent detection of the adult male fruit fly will extend the control area restrictions on Flinders Island until March 2019 - if there were no further detections.

The male fruit fly was detected at Lady Barron on Flinders Island near a previously infected property. Following the detections on Flinders Island earlier this year there is an ongoing response on the Island and eradication activities will be resumed around the detection site. These activities include property inspections, spot baiting, installation of additional traps, collection of fallen fruit and the implementation of larval surveys consistent with National protocols.

The identification of the fly was made late last week and since its confirmation we have been undertaking response planning and notifying stakeholders in line with established protocols.

Biosecurity Tasmania remains confident that fruit fly can be eradicated from Flinders Island and all of Tasmania and are focussed on this goal.

There have been no further detections in any other areas of Flinders Island, or northern Tasmania. 

Due to the location of the detection, it is believed the detection is of an overwintering fruit fly on the Island. Because of the slightly warmer climate, the possibility of an overwintering fruit fly on Flinders Island has been a scenario Biosecurity Tasmania has been prepared for.

Returning residents and visitors are reminded not to bring host produce onto the Island and obey airport and coastal access point signs and use fruit disposal bins provided when leaving the Control Area. Biosecurity officers and detector dogs will continue their role of checking incoming passengers for fruit on arrival at Launceston airport.

Biosecurity Tasmania asks for the continued support of Flinders Island residents to ensure we eradicate fruit fly from the I​sland and reduce the risk of its further movement. Further information on Queensland fruit fly is available on the Biosecurity Tasmania website: www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/fruitfly​ 

​Report any fruit fly sightings to the Hotline on 03 6165 3774

(18/12/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 28/2018 – Revocation of IR 25: Green Snail – Vector Import Controls

​An Import Risk Analysis (IRA) was conducted in 2018 on the potential threats posed to Tasmania by the green snail (Cantareus apertus). This is part of Biosecurity Tasmania’s plant biosecurity risk analysis program, which identifies and reviews pest risks that may present a threat to the State in association with the daily trade of goods, services and movement of people. The Green Snail Import Risk Analysis is now available on the Biosecurity Tasmania website

The risk analysis has resulted in the risk rating of green snail being amended from the status of a List A ‘Regulated Quarantine Pest (RQP)’ (as declared under Section 12 of the Plant Quarantine Act 1997), to that of an ‘Unwanted Quarantine Pest (UQP)’ which better aligns with the biosecurity risk the snail poses to Tasmania. Regulatory action will be taken if green snail is detected in imported goods at the Tasmanian biosecurity border.

Further information on Biosecurity Tasmania’s three tier pest categorisation system can be found on the Biosecurity Tasmania website

For more information contact Biosecurity Tasmania on 03 6165 3777 or email: Biosecurity.Tasmania@dpipwe.tas.gov.au​

(21/11/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 24/2018 - Public comment invited on proposal to import White-cheeked gibbon into Tasmania

​The Wildlife Management Branch of the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment  have received a submission for the White Cheeked Gibbon Nomascus leucogenys species profiles for consideration to import into Tasmania. 

Public comments are invited by 01 October 2018
  
Details of the species profile and risk assessment is available for viewing on the DPIPWE website at:  


(19/9/2018)
Categories: Invasive Species; Natural environment; Policy and Legislation; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 23/2018 - Public comment invited on proposal to import Burmese python, Green anaconda and Indian star tortoise into Tasmania

​The Wildlife Management Branch of DPIPWE has received submissions for the Indian star tortoise Geochelone elegans, Green anaconda Eunectes murinus  and Burmese python  Python bivittatus species profiles for consideration to import into Tasmania.  

Public comments are invited by 11 September 2018

Details of the risk assessment are available for viewing on the DPIPWE website at:  

https://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/wildlife-management/management-of-wildlife/wildlife-imports/species-risk-assessments-for-comment

(29/8/2018)
Categories: Invasive Species; Natural environment; Wildlife; Livestock; Policy and Legislation; Freshwater pests;


Biosecurity Advisory 17/2018 - Soft-shell clam detected in south east Tasmania

The Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment (DPIPWE) is investigating the detection of the introduced soft-shell clam on a beach on the Prosser River at Orford in south east Tasmania. 

The clam is a large bivalve marine mollusc and genetic sequencing has confirmed it is Mya japonica. Soft-shell clams are native to the Northern Hemisphere, and this is the first detection of soft-shell clam in the Southern Hemisphere.  The response to this detection is being managed in accordance with the National System for the Prevention and Management of Marine Pest Incursions within nationally agreed protocols.

Soft-shell clams can grow up to 150 mm and typically live in sand, mud and gravel in shallow sub-tidal and intertidal zones. The clam exists beneath the sediment surface burying itself up to 50 cm deep. It uses long siphons, which pump water for respiration, feeding and spawning.

Considered an invasive species for their potential to outcompete native species for habitat, Mya japonica represents a potential marine pest risk to other areas of Tasmania and Australia through the spread of larvae on water currents.

Biosecurity Tasmania is currently investigating appropriate surveillance methods to understand the extent of the soft-shell clam incursion and possible response options, including if eradication is feasible or if control methods should be adopted. DPIPWE will pro-actively engage with all biosecurity and scientific groups, the seafood industry, the local councils and communities on this issue to determine the best future strategy.

It is very important that the clams are not collected or moved to other locations.​

Anyone finding what they suspect to be a soft-shell clam are encouraged to contact DPIPWE on telephone at 03 6165 3777 or email: invasivespecies@dpipwe.tas.gov.au

Images of the soft-shell clam can be found on the DPIPWE website at www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/softshellclam

Supplying a photograph of the suspected soft-shell clam would assist in identification.

(19/6/2018)
Categories: Freshwater pests; Invasive Species; Marine pests; Natural environment; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 16/2018 – Caring for sheep and livestock in extreme weather - Animal welfare alert

Biosecurity Tasmania urges owners of sheep to be vigilant for any signs in their flock of cold stress brought about by forecast cold conditions and heavy rains. Sheep recently shorn and new lambs could be suffering due to the weather conditions and all reasonable precautions should be taken to minimise the effects of cold stress.

Sheep have a natural insulation to extreme weather with their fleece. In cold, wet and windy conditions, sheep shiver, huddle together in the mob and seek shelter behind windbreaks to produce and conserve heat. However, these mechanisms have limits. If weather stress is excessive or prolonged, the sheep's capacity to maintain a stable body temperature may be exceeded and cold stress will result. Hypothermia most commonly occurs in freshly shorn, light condition sheep during wet and windy conditions at any time of the year

Hypothermia literally means 'temperature below normal', occurs when too much body heat is lost or too little body heat is produced, and the result is a drop in body temperature. If weather stress is excessive or prolonged, a sheep's capacity to maintain a stable body temperature may be exceeded, and heat or cold stress will result.

High rainfall and high winds combined with temperatures below normal will cause mortalities in young animals, especially newly shorn sheep without shelter. The impact of the cold weather will depend on its duration, rainfall, wind speed and temperature—the 'wind chill' factor can double heat loss.

Sheep suffering from hypothermia often die as a result of their own behaviour and their attempts to cope. Sheep move in the direction of the wind until they are stopped by a barrier such as a fence, gully or creek. At this point they may pile on top of each other leading to suffocation or drowning. Sheep may be reluctant or unable to move when wet and cold.

Initially sheep will try to maintain their body temperature by:

  • shallow breathing in order to reduce the rate of respiration (that is, rapid respiration or panting causes heat loss)
  • shivering
  • seeking shelter
  • huddling together

If dealing with a small flock, consider applying garbage bags as coats for the sheep. Trials have shown that properly fitted plastic bags can decrease the loss of body heat even in severely hypothermic sheep.

Be prepared to relocate animals to a shed or land on higher ground, or move stock to paddocks with adequate windbreaks with tree or bush shelter in the event of very heavy rainfall or likely flooding.

Prioritise your animals, giving shelter to the most vulnerable such as the ewes and lambs and those newly shorn.

The Bureau of Meteorology have issued a flood watch for low lying / flood susceptible areas on Tasmania's east coast, advising graziers that they should prepare to move stock in expectation of heavy rainfall. Visit the BOM website for more information: http://www.bom.gov.au/jsp/watl/rainfall/pme.jsp

More information on caring for your sheep during cold weather can be found on the DPIPWE/Biosecurity Tasmania website: http://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/animal-biosecurity/animal-welfare/hobby-farmers-and-smallholders/caring-for-sheep-in-cold-weather​​

(9/5/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Natural environment; Pasture; Policy and Legislation; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 16/2017 - Public comment invited on proposal to import Sumatran tiger into Tasmania

The Wildlife Management Branch received species profile to facilitate risk assessments for the potential import into Tasmania of;

 Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae)
 
Public comments are invited by 21 December 2017

The Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae) is one of six sub-species of the Tiger (Panthera tigris), all of which are either endangered or critically endangered.  The Sumatran tiger is listed as critically endangered by the IUCN, and is managed in Australia and New Zealand through the Zoo and Aquarium Association (ZAA) Australasian Species Management Program (ASMP). The ZAA program provides the maximum possible support for the conservation of Sumatran tigers in the wild via:
  • An assurance population against extinction in the wild;
  • A potential source population for demographic and/or genetic supplementation in the event of severe decline in the wild;
  • As a source population for research that may benefit the conservation of wild tigers or improve our understanding of the species;
  • As a source population for training activities that may benefit the management of wild tigers (eg, capture techniques that can be applied to conflict tigers);
  • As a charismatic species for exhibition and education programs to increase awareness of human impacts on wildlife and inspire support of conservation activities and actions; and
  • As ambassadors for fund-raising efforts for in situ conservation projects that benefit wild tigers and their habitats.
Through the ZAA ASMP the Sumatran tiger may only be offered to wildlife parks and zoos within Australia and New Zealand that are full accredited ZAA members.

The Sumatran tiger is the smallest of all Tiger species and behaviorally, are generally solitary animals. 

The species profile provided has been submitted by a third party, which is predominately used to undertake the risk assessment. DPIPWE has accepted and published the information contained in the species profile in good faith but accepts no responsibility for its accuracy, nor does DPIPWE accept any responsibility associated with the publishing of this material including, but not limited to, liability associated with copyright.

Risk Assessment:

A risk assessment has been undertaken by specialist staff from the Department including, policy and wildlife officers, ecologists and veterinary officers from Biosecurity Tasmania. 
The risk assessment considers three main areas of risk:
  1. Public safety
  2. Establishment 
  3. Consequence

The risk to public safety is considered highly dangerous in the event that the species escaped captivity.

The likelihood of establishment is considered extremely low due to an inappropriate climate match.

The consequence of establishment is considered moderate because of the low climate match, and the species is not known to be a pest, would not harm property but could harm livestock.

Taking these factors into consideration, the risk assessment concluded that the risk posed by importing Sumatran tiger into Tasmania is serious. 

Mitigation:

Any decision to allow the import of Sumatran tiger into Tasmania would only be considered where:
  • The species is imported by a Wildlife Exhibition Licence holder that has appropriate facilities to securely house the species.
  • The wildlife exhibition facility can clearly demonstrate they have proficient keepers for that particular species.
Standard conditions associated with the import of a serious risk species include, but are not limited to:
  • Import and keeping is only permitted by facilities approved to keep the species under licence.
  • The wildlife facility must meet minimum standards for animal welfare, human safety and security.
  • The animal must not be released, or be allowed to escape from effective control.
  • Animal welfare requirements under the Animal Welfare Act 1993 and any approved Code of Practice or Management Plan must be met.
  • Individuals must be micro-chipped or otherwise identified.
  • The wildlife facility must be available for inspection at any reasonable time.
  • The maximum number of individuals of a species held at the wildlife facility is to be stipulated on the licence, taking into account relevant factors.  Gender may also be stipulated.  
  • Written approval must be sought prior to movement of animals between wildlife facilities and trade of the species under licence.
  • Record keeping and reporting must be provided to DPIPWE as required by DPIPWE. 
  • Collections containing species subject to approval by DPIPWE must accord with the relevant code of practice for keeping that species.

Provided these mitigation measures are in place and continually complied with, the level of risk to Tasmania of holding the Sumatran tiger within a wildlife facility is considered reduced.

Right to Information Act 2009 and confidentiality: 
Please note that submissions will be treated as public documents. By law, information provided to the Government may be provided to an applicant under the provisions of the Right to Information Act 2009

When making your submission, please detail any reasons why you consider the information that you have provided is confidential or should not be publicly released. Your reasons will be taken into account in determining whether or not to release the information.

(11/12/2017)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;

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