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Tasmanian Biosecurity Advisories

Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment

Latest Advisories

Subscribing to get DPIPWE’s Biosecurity Advisories is the best way you can keep yourself up-to-date and fully informed about Tasmanian biosecurity issues. Our Advisories cover topics such as changes or proposed changes to Tasmania’s import regulations, animal health and welfare, plant health, forthcoming regulation reviews and opportunities for public comment, new or emerging pest/disease risks and a range of other matters related to Tasmania’s biosecurity.


Biosecurity Advisory 19/2018 - Citrus canker - amendment to Import Requirement 31

​Biosecurity Tasmania wish to advise that Import Requirement 31 relating to hosts and vectors of citrus canker has been amended, effective as at 27 June 2018. 

Import Requirement 31 was reinstated on 2 May 2018 following detection of the disease in the Northern Territory.  It has since been confirmed that citrus canker is present in some areas of Western Australia.

Citrus canker (Xanthomonas citri susbp. citri) is a serious disease of citrus and can have severe impacts on fruit quality and yield. Citrus canker is not harmful to people or animals. Citrus canker has been detected in Australia previously and been successfully eradicated.

Import Requirement 31 has been amended to: 
  • Extend the host list in accordance with technical advice; and
  • Recognise an approved arrangement for supply of citrus fruit out of the Northern Territory and Western Australia under property freedom with additional biosecurity conditions. This arrangement does not apply to properties where citrus canker is present.
Find the amended Import Requirement 31 on the Biosecurity Tasmania website at: www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/plant-biosecurity/plant-import-restrictions​​​​

For more information on citrus canker, signs and symptoms, visit the NSW Department of Primary Industries website at: www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/biosecurity/plant/insect-pests-and-plant-diseases/citrus-canker

Further information can also be obtained at the Outbreak website: www.outbreak.gov.au/current-responses-to-outbreaks/citrus-canker

If you think you have seen symptoms that look like citrus canker, call the Plant Pest Hotline on 1800 084 881​

(4/7/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Gene technology; Horticulture; Natural environment; Pasture; Policy and Legislation; Seeds;


Biosecurity Advisory 18/2018 - Import Requirement 46 – Tomato Potato Psyllid Hosts and Vectors

Biosecurity Tasmania wish to advise that Import Requirement 46 relating to hosts and vectors of tomato potato psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli (Šulc) (syn. Trioza cockerelli Šulc)) has been formally declared on 8 June 2018. This import requirement is in response to the detection and establishment of tomato potato psyllid (TPP) ​​​in the Perth metropolitan area, Western Australia, and as a precautionary measure in the event the psyllid is detected in other parts of Australia.

TPP is recognised internationally as a very serious pest of solanaceous hosts like potato, tomato, capsicum and eggplant. The potato processing industry in Tasmania is considered to be a very important agricultural industry sector in the State generating $100 -150 million per annum.

The Import Requirement 46 – Tomato Potato Psyllid Hosts and Vectors is effective from 22 June 2018.


For more information on tomato potato psyllid, visit:

(20/6/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Natural environment; Seeds; Invasive Species; Pasture; Policy and Legislation; Livestock;


Biosecurity Advisory 17/2018 - Soft-shell clam detected in south east Tasmania

The Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment (DPIPWE) is investigating the detection of the introduced soft-shell clam on a beach on the Prosser River at Orford in south east Tasmania. 

The clam is a large bivalve marine mollusc and genetic sequencing has confirmed it is Mya japonica. Soft-shell clams are native to the Northern Hemisphere, and this is the first detection of soft-shell clam in the Southern Hemisphere.  The response to this detection is being managed in accordance with the National System for the Prevention and Management of Marine Pest Incursions within nationally agreed protocols.

Soft-shell clams can grow up to 150 mm and typically live in sand, mud and gravel in shallow sub-tidal and intertidal zones. The clam exists beneath the sediment surface burying itself up to 50 cm deep. It uses long siphons, which pump water for respiration, feeding and spawning.

Considered an invasive species for their potential to outcompete native species for habitat, Mya japonica represents a potential marine pest risk to other areas of Tasmania and Australia through the spread of larvae on water currents.

Biosecurity Tasmania is currently investigating appropriate surveillance methods to understand the extent of the soft-shell clam incursion and possible response options, including if eradication is feasible or if control methods should be adopted. DPIPWE will pro-actively engage with all biosecurity and scientific groups, the seafood industry, the local councils and communities on this issue to determine the best future strategy.

It is very important that the clams are not collected or moved to other locations.​

Anyone finding what they suspect to be a soft-shell clam are encouraged to contact DPIPWE on telephone at 03 6165 3777 or email: invasivespecies@dpipwe.tas.gov.au

Images of the soft-shell clam can be found on the DPIPWE website at www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/softshellclam

Supplying a photograph of the suspected soft-shell clam would assist in identification.

(19/6/2018)
Categories: Freshwater pests; Invasive Species; Marine pests; Natural environment; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 15/2018 - Fruit Fly Update - 4 May 2018

​A major effort is being undertaken to eradicate fruit fly from Tasmania.

Included in this effort has been:
  • Approximately 2500 properties have cooperated with the fruit fly response
  • Spot baiting undertaken at approximately 1200 properties
  • Surveillance through checking of around 1000 permanent traps placed around the state
  • Checking of an additional 333 surveillance traps placed around infected sites
  • Approximately 4500 trap checks undertaken
  • Approximately 3300 larval surveys undertaken
This work would not have been possible without the support of the community and industry which has enabled access to properties for surveillance and eradication activities as well as reported possible signed of fruit fly for follow-up investigation.

Encouragingly, there have been no further detections of fruit fly either within or outside current control areas since the last update.    

On Flinders Island, no detections have been made at either Badger Corner or Trousers Point since January. At Lady Barron no detections have been made since March 21.

Within the northern control area no detections have been made at or near the Spreyton site since March 16.  At George Town no detections have been made since April 2. While at the other infected site, no detections have been made since February 14.

Although no further detections have been made, there is still further work to be undertaken to ensure these areas can be declared fruit fly free again and enable access to markets where restrictions are in place.

Agreement from the Commonwealth and trading partners is required to achieve the fruit fly freedom status. This means that Tasmania needs to maintain identified processes to give certainty to the Australian Government and our trading partners that we have eradicated fruit fly from the State.

While the cooler winter weather is believed to be a barrier to fruit fly establishment in Tasmania, this alone cannot be relied on to achieve eradication so it is necessary to continue with control measures over coming months.  

This means that we will need to maintain the current control areas on Flinders Island and in northern Tasmania for the coming months until agreement is reached with the Commonwealth and trading partners that they can be lifted.

The Government is continuing to work with the Australian Government to identify what measures and requirements continue to be needed and for how long to meet requirements for fruit fly freedom status being recognised.

The Department will continue to keep industry and the community informed of requirements and changes to requirements.

Mowbray update     

This site was not an outbreak but was investigated in line with established protocols for single fly detections. There have been no further fruit fly detections at Mowbray. Earlier this month, a single adult male Queensland fruit fly was detected at a residential property in Mowbray. Approximately 40 fruit fly traps have been established in the surrounding area and all fruit trees and other host plants have been inspected on more than 100 properties in the immediate vicinity.  Inspections consist of examining all fruit on trees for any evidence of infestation, plus taking a quantity of fruit from the tree and any fruit on the ground to be cut into small pieces to determine if any larvae are present. No further fruit flies have been detected. No evidence of larval infestation has been found. The traps will continue to be inspected for a period of nine (9) weeks after the initial detection.

Further information on fruit fly in Tasmania can be found on the DPIPWE website at: dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/plant-biosecurity/pests-and-diseases/fruit-fly​

(4/5/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 14/2018 - Citrus canker - reinstatement of import requirement in Tasmania

​Citrus canker (Xanthomonas citri susbp citri) has recently been detected in the Northern Territory.  Citrus canker is a serious disease of citrus and can have severe impacts on fruit quality and yield. Citrus canker is not harmful to people or animals.

Biosecurity Tasmania has declared citrus canker to be a List A disease under the Plant Quarantine Act 1997 and has re-in​stated the Import Requirement on the import of Citrus plants and plant products (including leaf material and fruit) as well as agricultural equipment and machinery that may have been in contact with the disease.

Find the re-instated​ Import Requirement 31 on the Biosecurity Tasmania website at: www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/plant-biosecurity/plant-import-restrictions​

Citrus canker has been detected in Australia previously and been successfully eradicated.

For more information on citrus canker, signs and symptoms, visit the NSW Department of Primary Industries website at: www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/biosecurity/plant/in​​​​​​sect-pests-and-plant-diseases/citrus-canker​

Furher information can also be obtained at the Outbreak website: www.outbreak.gov.au/current-r​esponses-to-outbreaks/citrus-canker​

If you think you have seen symptoms that look like citrus canker, call the Plant Pest Hotline on ​1800 084 881

(3/5/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Gene technology; Horticulture; Natural environment; Pasture; Policy and Legislation; Seeds;

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