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Tasmanian Biosecurity Advisories

Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment

Latest Advisories

Subscribing to get DPIPWE’s Biosecurity Advisories is the best way you can keep yourself up-to-date and fully informed about Tasmanian biosecurity issues. Our Advisories cover topics such as changes or proposed changes to Tasmania’s import regulations, animal health and welfare, plant health, forthcoming regulation reviews and opportunities for public comment, new or emerging pest/disease risks and a range of other matters related to Tasmania’s biosecurity.


61 advisories found for Plant pests.
 

Biosecurity Advisory 28/2018 – Revocation of IR 25: Green Snail – Vector Import Controls

​An Import Risk Analysis (IRA) was conducted in 2018 on the potential threats posed to Tasmania by the green snail (Cantareus apertus). This is part of Biosecurity Tasmania’s plant biosecurity risk analysis program, which identifies and reviews pest risks that may present a threat to the State in association with the daily trade of goods, services and movement of people. The Green Snail Import Risk Analysis is now available on the Biosecurity Tasmania website

The risk analysis has resulted in the risk rating of green snail being amended from the status of a List A ‘Regulated Quarantine Pest (RQP)’ (as declared under Section 12 of the Plant Quarantine Act 1997), to that of an ‘Unwanted Quarantine Pest (UQP)’ which better aligns with the biosecurity risk the snail poses to Tasmania. Regulatory action will be taken if green snail is detected in imported goods at the Tasmanian biosecurity border.

Further information on Biosecurity Tasmania’s three tier pest categorisation system can be found on the Biosecurity Tasmania website

For more information contact Biosecurity Tasmania on 03 6165 3777 or email: Biosecurity.Tasmania@dpipwe.tas.gov.au​

(21/11/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 27/2018 – Amendments to Import Requirement 33 – Hosts of Silverleaf Whitefly and (Bemisia tabaci Gennadius) and Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus

​Amendments to Import Requirement (IR) 33 will come into effect from Wednesday 19 December 2018. The regulatory changes to IR33 were declared in a public notice published on 14 November 2018, following a 30 day public consultation on the draft Import Risk Analysis (IRA) in August 2018.

As a result of a number of incursions of the pest Silverleaf Whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) in recent years, in association with imported poinsettia’s for retail commercial sale over the festive season, it was determined special attention needed to be given to reviewing whether or not IR33 remained fit-for-purpose (as per Biosecurity Advisory 22/2018 which is published on the Tasmanian Biosecurity Advisory website). The final version of the IRA for Silverleaf Whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) is available on the Biosecurity Tasmania website

The IRA found that the risk in trade presented by the pest Silverleaf Whitefly (SLW) remains significant and to retain it as a List A Regulated Quarantine Pest of concern to the State. The report also found that another viral pathogen, Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus (TYLCV) which is one of the most significant viral pathogens of tomato in the world today, also remain a List A Regulated Quarantine Pest of concern to the State. Both these pests are not present in Tasmania, as officially supported by Area Freedom Certificate.

This IRA also identified a further viral pathogen that Silverleaf Whitefly can vector called Cowpea Mild Mottle Virus (CPMMV), which is not currently present in Tasmania, and may present some background risk to the State. Though CPMMV is not as serious a threat as that presented by either SLW or TYLCV, it was recommended that the pathogen be declared an ‘Unwanted Quarantine Pest’, under Biosecurity Tasmania’s three tier pest categorisation system. Further information on Biosecurity Tasmania’s three tier pest categorisation system can be found on the Biosecurity Tasmania website​

For more information contact Biosecurity Tasmania on 03 6165 3777 or email: Biosecurity.Tasmania@dpipwe,tas.gov.au

(21/11/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Natural environment; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Pasture; Seeds; Invasive Species;


Biosecurity Advisory 26/2018 - Biosecurity Tasmania has declared Giant Pine Scale to be an Unwanted Quarantine Pest for Tasmania

​Biosecurity Tasmania has declared the sap-sucking coniferous pest, giant pine scale (Marchalina hellenica), to be an ‘Unwanted Quarantine Pest (UQP)’ for Tasmania on 22 October 2018. The regulatory action taken is an interim risk mitigation measure whilst formal risk analysis work is undertaken to establish whether or not this important pest of conifer species such as pine, is a ‘Regulated Quarantine Pest’ of concern to the State under its List A Pests (copy of Tasmania’s existing List A plant pests can be found on the Biosecurity Tasmania website​). The move to list the pest as a UQP, means that if it were detected in imported plant material at the biosecurity border, regulatory action can be immediately undertaken to either treat, re-consign or destroy any plant material identified as being contaminated with the pest.

Survey work undertaken in Tasmania indicates that this significant pest of pines is not present in the State, and the size of the pine forest estate in Tasmania is very large, hence the need to keep it from entering Tasmania and causing economic loss to the industry.


Links which provide further information about, and images of, the pest can be found here:
  
Please stay alert and report to Biosecurity Tasmania any pest on pines in Tasmania that you think might be giant pine scale.

Contact Biosecurity Tasmania on 1300 368 550  or email: Biosecurity.planthealth@dpipwe.tas.gov.au

(23/10/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Natural environment; Policy and Legislation; Plant pests; Plant diseases; Pasture; Seeds; Timber imports;


Biosecurity Advisory 25/2018 – Queensland fruit fly: Changes to Restrictions in Control Areas

​Fruit fly was detected in northern Tasmania in January 2018. Part of the control and eradication actions in response to the fruit fly detection included the declaration of temporary Control Areas and Infected Areas, enforcing restrictions on host produce moving in and out of these areas. 

Biosecurity Tasmania advises that as of 1 October 2018 Control Area restrictions have changed to enable growers to sell their produce within the Control Areas.

What being in a Control Area means for residents:
  • Do NOT move host produce from inside a Control Area to outside a Control Area
From 1 October you CAN: 
    • Move home grown host produce from your property (give away or sell), as long as it does not leave a Control Area
    • Dispose of fruit as normal – double bagging is not required. 
    • Compost fruit in the Control Area
  • ​If you live in an Infected Area further restrictions apply. To find out if you are in an Infected Area and what you can do to continue to HELP eradicate fruit fly go to www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/fruitfly
What being in an Infected Area means for residents:
  • You can consume home grown host produce at home.
  • Do not move, give away or sell host produce from your property unless cooked or processed. 
  • Cut up fruit can be moved from your property if it is to be consumed, e.g. - in lunch boxes - with remains double-bagged.
  • You can buy host produce from retailers within a Control/Infected Area and transport it home – but you cannot then transport it outside an Infected Area.
  • Please ensure all rotten, fallen or remains of host produce are double bagged prior to placing in general waste.
  • Do not compost host produce inside an Infected Area.
  • Report all suspect produce to Biosecurity Tasmania on 6165 3774
What this mean for industry:
  • From 1 October, growers outside the 1.5 km Infected Area and inside the 15 km Control Area can move and sell untreated fruit within the 15km Control Areas​.
  • Existing control measures will stay in place for properties within the 1.5km Infected Areas.
  • Movement of fruit from inside to outside the Control Areas is still not allowed, unless fruit is appropriately dealt with under required protocols.
For further information on fruit fly, and to view maps to determine if you live in an Infected Area or a Control Area, visit the DPIPWE website at:  www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/fruitfly​ or phone 03 6165 3774.​

(2/10/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Natural environment; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Pasture; Seeds;


Biosecurity Advisory 22/2018 - Routine Import Risk Analysis (IRA) for Import Requirement 33 - Silverleaf Whitefly

​Routine Import Risk Analysis (IRA) for Import Requirement 33 - Silverleaf Whitefly
 
This Import Risk Analysis (IRA) has been conducted as part of Biosecurity Tasmania’s plant biosecurity risk analysis  program, where it identifies and reviews pest risks that may present a threat to the State in association with the daily trade of goods, services and movement of people. These IRA reporting processes are consistent with national and international guidelines. This IRA for Import Requirement 33 - Silverleaf Whitefly, also determines whether or not the Import Requirement is technically current.

The draft report can be downloaded here - Import Risk Analyses for Public Consultation

Comments can be provided to  Biosecurity.planthealth@dpipwe.tas.gov.au by  27 September 2018
 
For further detail please contact  - Biosecurity.planthealth@dpipwe.tas.gov.au

(27/8/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Pasture; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation;


Biosecurity Advisory 21/2018 - Routine Import Risk Analysis for Green snail Cantareus apertus (Born 1778)

​Routine Import Risk Analysis for Green snail Cantareus apertus (Born 1778)


This Import Risk Analysis (IRA) has been conducted as part of Biosecurity Tasmania’s plant biosecurity risk analysis program, where it identifies and reviews pest risks that may present a threat to the State in association with the daily trade of goods, services and movement of people. These IRA reporting processes are consistent with national and international guidelines. This IRA for Import Requirement 25 – Green snail, also determines whether or not the Import Requirement is technically current.
 
The draft report can be downloaded from here Import Risk Analyses for Public Consultation

Comments can be provided to  Biosecurity.planthealth@dpipwe.tas.gov.au by  27 September 2018
 
For further detail please contact  - Biosecurity.planthealth@dpipwe.tas.gov.au

(27/8/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Pasture; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation;


Biosecurity Advisory 18/2018 - Import Requirement 46 – Tomato Potato Psyllid Hosts and Vectors

Biosecurity Tasmania wish to advise that Import Requirement 46 relating to hosts and vectors of tomato potato psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli (Šulc) (syn. Trioza cockerelli Šulc)) has been formally declared on 8 June 2018. This import requirement is in response to the detection and establishment of tomato potato psyllid (TPP) ​​​in the Perth metropolitan area, Western Australia, and as a precautionary measure in the event the psyllid is detected in other parts of Australia.

TPP is recognised internationally as a very serious pest of solanaceous hosts like potato, tomato, capsicum and eggplant. The potato processing industry in Tasmania is considered to be a very important agricultural industry sector in the State generating $100 -150 million per annum.

The Import Requirement 46 – Tomato Potato Psyllid Hosts and Vectors is effective from 22 June 2018.


For more information on tomato potato psyllid, visit:

(20/6/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds;


Biosecurity Advisory 15/2018 - Fruit Fly Update - 4 May 2018

​A major effort is being undertaken to eradicate fruit fly from Tasmania.

Included in this effort has been:
  • Approximately 2500 properties have cooperated with the fruit fly response
  • Spot baiting undertaken at approximately 1200 properties
  • Surveillance through checking of around 1000 permanent traps placed around the state
  • Checking of an additional 333 surveillance traps placed around infected sites
  • Approximately 4500 trap checks undertaken
  • Approximately 3300 larval surveys undertaken
This work would not have been possible without the support of the community and industry which has enabled access to properties for surveillance and eradication activities as well as reported possible signed of fruit fly for follow-up investigation.

Encouragingly, there have been no further detections of fruit fly either within or outside current control areas since the last update.    

On Flinders Island, no detections have been made at either Badger Corner or Trousers Point since January. At Lady Barron no detections have been made since March 21.

Within the northern control area no detections have been made at or near the Spreyton site since March 16.  At George Town no detections have been made since April 2. While at the other infected site, no detections have been made since February 14.

Although no further detections have been made, there is still further work to be undertaken to ensure these areas can be declared fruit fly free again and enable access to markets where restrictions are in place.

Agreement from the Commonwealth and trading partners is required to achieve the fruit fly freedom status. This means that Tasmania needs to maintain identified processes to give certainty to the Australian Government and our trading partners that we have eradicated fruit fly from the State.

While the cooler winter weather is believed to be a barrier to fruit fly establishment in Tasmania, this alone cannot be relied on to achieve eradication so it is necessary to continue with control measures over coming months.  

This means that we will need to maintain the current control areas on Flinders Island and in northern Tasmania for the coming months until agreement is reached with the Commonwealth and trading partners that they can be lifted.

The Government is continuing to work with the Australian Government to identify what measures and requirements continue to be needed and for how long to meet requirements for fruit fly freedom status being recognised.

The Department will continue to keep industry and the community informed of requirements and changes to requirements.

Mowbray update     

This site was not an outbreak but was investigated in line with established protocols for single fly detections. There have been no further fruit fly detections at Mowbray. Earlier this month, a single adult male Queensland fruit fly was detected at a residential property in Mowbray. Approximately 40 fruit fly traps have been established in the surrounding area and all fruit trees and other host plants have been inspected on more than 100 properties in the immediate vicinity.  Inspections consist of examining all fruit on trees for any evidence of infestation, plus taking a quantity of fruit from the tree and any fruit on the ground to be cut into small pieces to determine if any larvae are present. No further fruit flies have been detected. No evidence of larval infestation has been found. The traps will continue to be inspected for a period of nine (9) weeks after the initial detection.

Further information on fruit fly in Tasmania can be found on the DPIPWE website at: dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/plant-biosecurity/pests-and-diseases/fruit-fly​

(4/5/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Natural environment; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation;


Biosecurity Advisory 12/2018 - Public comment invited on a proposal to import African painted dog into Tasmania

​Public comment is invited on a proposal to import the African Painted Dog into Tasmania. The Wildlife Management Branch received a resubmission of the African painted dog (Lycaon pictus) species profile for reconsideration to import into Tasmania.  The new version clarifies and provides additional information in relation to the species risk and status. Included is a letter of support from the Zoo and Aquarium Association, confirming how the proposed collaboration of holding a small group of non-breeding animals will benefit the Population Management Program for this endangered species.

 
Public comments are invited by 27 March 2018
  
Details of the risk assessment is available for viewing on the DPIPWE website at:   http://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/wildlife-management/management-of-wildlife/wildlife-imports/species-risk-assessments-for-comment​

(14/3/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Pasture; Plant pests;


Biosecurity Advisory 11/2018 - Notice of change Import Requirement 2 - Fruit fly host produce - Disinfestation with Methyl Bromide

​Biosecurity Tasmania wish to advise that existing Import Requirement 2 in relation to fruit fly host product entering Tasmania has been modified to ensure risk produce is fumigated at a higher temperature.
This is being implemented as  a precautionary measure in a bid to further mitigate risk under current unusual Queensland fruit fly pressure.
This requirement along with others related to fruit fly risk mitigation will continue to be reviewed as per routine practice to ensure requirements are appropriate to the risk.
The revised Import Requirement 2 - Fruit Fly Host Produce - Disinfestation with Methyl Bromide is effective as of 2 March 2018
Details can be found at http://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/plant-biosecurity/plant-import-restrictions

(9/3/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation;

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