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Tasmanian Biosecurity Advisories

Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment

Latest Advisories

Subscribing to get DPIPWE’s Biosecurity Advisories is the best way you can keep yourself up-to-date and fully informed about Tasmanian biosecurity issues. Our Advisories cover topics such as changes or proposed changes to Tasmania’s import regulations, animal health and welfare, plant health, forthcoming regulation reviews and opportunities for public comment, new or emerging pest/disease risks and a range of other matters related to Tasmania’s biosecurity.


56 advisories found for Plant diseases.
 

Biosecurity Advisory 28/2018 – Revocation of IR 25: Green Snail – Vector Import Controls

​An Import Risk Analysis (IRA) was conducted in 2018 on the potential threats posed to Tasmania by the green snail (Cantareus apertus). This is part of Biosecurity Tasmania’s plant biosecurity risk analysis program, which identifies and reviews pest risks that may present a threat to the State in association with the daily trade of goods, services and movement of people. The Green Snail Import Risk Analysis is now available on the Biosecurity Tasmania website

The risk analysis has resulted in the risk rating of green snail being amended from the status of a List A ‘Regulated Quarantine Pest (RQP)’ (as declared under Section 12 of the Plant Quarantine Act 1997), to that of an ‘Unwanted Quarantine Pest (UQP)’ which better aligns with the biosecurity risk the snail poses to Tasmania. Regulatory action will be taken if green snail is detected in imported goods at the Tasmanian biosecurity border.

Further information on Biosecurity Tasmania’s three tier pest categorisation system can be found on the Biosecurity Tasmania website

For more information contact Biosecurity Tasmania on 03 6165 3777 or email: Biosecurity.Tasmania@dpipwe.tas.gov.au​

(21/11/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 27/2018 – Amendments to Import Requirement 33 – Hosts of Silverleaf Whitefly and (Bemisia tabaci Gennadius) and Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus

​Amendments to Import Requirement (IR) 33 will come into effect from Wednesday 19 December 2018. The regulatory changes to IR33 were declared in a public notice published on 14 November 2018, following a 30 day public consultation on the draft Import Risk Analysis (IRA) in August 2018.

As a result of a number of incursions of the pest Silverleaf Whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) in recent years, in association with imported poinsettia’s for retail commercial sale over the festive season, it was determined special attention needed to be given to reviewing whether or not IR33 remained fit-for-purpose (as per Biosecurity Advisory 22/2018 which is published on the Tasmanian Biosecurity Advisory website). The final version of the IRA for Silverleaf Whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) is available on the Biosecurity Tasmania website

The IRA found that the risk in trade presented by the pest Silverleaf Whitefly (SLW) remains significant and to retain it as a List A Regulated Quarantine Pest of concern to the State. The report also found that another viral pathogen, Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus (TYLCV) which is one of the most significant viral pathogens of tomato in the world today, also remain a List A Regulated Quarantine Pest of concern to the State. Both these pests are not present in Tasmania, as officially supported by Area Freedom Certificate.

This IRA also identified a further viral pathogen that Silverleaf Whitefly can vector called Cowpea Mild Mottle Virus (CPMMV), which is not currently present in Tasmania, and may present some background risk to the State. Though CPMMV is not as serious a threat as that presented by either SLW or TYLCV, it was recommended that the pathogen be declared an ‘Unwanted Quarantine Pest’, under Biosecurity Tasmania’s three tier pest categorisation system. Further information on Biosecurity Tasmania’s three tier pest categorisation system can be found on the Biosecurity Tasmania website​

For more information contact Biosecurity Tasmania on 03 6165 3777 or email: Biosecurity.Tasmania@dpipwe,tas.gov.au

(21/11/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Natural environment; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Pasture; Seeds; Invasive Species;


Biosecurity Advisory 26/2018 - Biosecurity Tasmania has declared Giant Pine Scale to be an Unwanted Quarantine Pest for Tasmania

​Biosecurity Tasmania has declared the sap-sucking coniferous pest, giant pine scale (Marchalina hellenica), to be an ‘Unwanted Quarantine Pest (UQP)’ for Tasmania on 22 October 2018. The regulatory action taken is an interim risk mitigation measure whilst formal risk analysis work is undertaken to establish whether or not this important pest of conifer species such as pine, is a ‘Regulated Quarantine Pest’ of concern to the State under its List A Pests (copy of Tasmania’s existing List A plant pests can be found on the Biosecurity Tasmania website​). The move to list the pest as a UQP, means that if it were detected in imported plant material at the biosecurity border, regulatory action can be immediately undertaken to either treat, re-consign or destroy any plant material identified as being contaminated with the pest.

Survey work undertaken in Tasmania indicates that this significant pest of pines is not present in the State, and the size of the pine forest estate in Tasmania is very large, hence the need to keep it from entering Tasmania and causing economic loss to the industry.


Links which provide further information about, and images of, the pest can be found here:
  
Please stay alert and report to Biosecurity Tasmania any pest on pines in Tasmania that you think might be giant pine scale.

Contact Biosecurity Tasmania on 1300 368 550  or email: Biosecurity.planthealth@dpipwe.tas.gov.au

(23/10/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Natural environment; Policy and Legislation; Plant pests; Plant diseases; Pasture; Seeds; Timber imports;


Biosecurity Advisory 25/2018 – Queensland fruit fly: Changes to Restrictions in Control Areas

​Fruit fly was detected in northern Tasmania in January 2018. Part of the control and eradication actions in response to the fruit fly detection included the declaration of temporary Control Areas and Infected Areas, enforcing restrictions on host produce moving in and out of these areas. 

Biosecurity Tasmania advises that as of 1 October 2018 Control Area restrictions have changed to enable growers to sell their produce within the Control Areas.

What being in a Control Area means for residents:
  • Do NOT move host produce from inside a Control Area to outside a Control Area
From 1 October you CAN: 
    • Move home grown host produce from your property (give away or sell), as long as it does not leave a Control Area
    • Dispose of fruit as normal – double bagging is not required. 
    • Compost fruit in the Control Area
  • ​If you live in an Infected Area further restrictions apply. To find out if you are in an Infected Area and what you can do to continue to HELP eradicate fruit fly go to www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/fruitfly
What being in an Infected Area means for residents:
  • You can consume home grown host produce at home.
  • Do not move, give away or sell host produce from your property unless cooked or processed. 
  • Cut up fruit can be moved from your property if it is to be consumed, e.g. - in lunch boxes - with remains double-bagged.
  • You can buy host produce from retailers within a Control/Infected Area and transport it home – but you cannot then transport it outside an Infected Area.
  • Please ensure all rotten, fallen or remains of host produce are double bagged prior to placing in general waste.
  • Do not compost host produce inside an Infected Area.
  • Report all suspect produce to Biosecurity Tasmania on 6165 3774
What this mean for industry:
  • From 1 October, growers outside the 1.5 km Infected Area and inside the 15 km Control Area can move and sell untreated fruit within the 15km Control Areas​.
  • Existing control measures will stay in place for properties within the 1.5km Infected Areas.
  • Movement of fruit from inside to outside the Control Areas is still not allowed, unless fruit is appropriately dealt with under required protocols.
For further information on fruit fly, and to view maps to determine if you live in an Infected Area or a Control Area, visit the DPIPWE website at:  www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/fruitfly​ or phone 03 6165 3774.​

(2/10/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Natural environment; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Pasture; Seeds;


Biosecurity Advisory 19/2018 - Citrus canker - amendment to Import Requirement 31

​Biosecurity Tasmania wish to advise that Import Requirement 31 relating to hosts and vectors of citrus canker has been amended, effective as at 27 June 2018. 

Import Requirement 31 was reinstated on 2 May 2018 following detection of the disease in the Northern Territory.  It has since been confirmed that citrus canker is present in some areas of Western Australia.

Citrus canker (Xanthomonas citri susbp. citri) is a serious disease of citrus and can have severe impacts on fruit quality and yield. Citrus canker is not harmful to people or animals. Citrus canker has been detected in Australia previously and been successfully eradicated.

Import Requirement 31 has been amended to: 
  • Extend the host list in accordance with technical advice; and
  • Recognise an approved arrangement for supply of citrus fruit out of the Northern Territory and Western Australia under property freedom with additional biosecurity conditions. This arrangement does not apply to properties where citrus canker is present.
Find the amended Import Requirement 31 on the Biosecurity Tasmania website at: www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/plant-biosecurity/plant-import-restrictions​​​​

For more information on citrus canker, signs and symptoms, visit the NSW Department of Primary Industries website at: www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/biosecurity/plant/insect-pests-and-plant-diseases/citrus-canker

Further information can also be obtained at the Outbreak website: www.outbreak.gov.au/current-responses-to-outbreaks/citrus-canker

If you think you have seen symptoms that look like citrus canker, call the Plant Pest Hotline on 1800 084 881​

(4/7/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Gene technology; Horticulture; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Policy and Legislation; Seeds;


Biosecurity Advisory 14/2018 - Citrus canker - reinstatement of import requirement in Tasmania

​Citrus canker (Xanthomonas citri susbp citri) has recently been detected in the Northern Territory.  Citrus canker is a serious disease of citrus and can have severe impacts on fruit quality and yield. Citrus canker is not harmful to people or animals.

Biosecurity Tasmania has declared citrus canker to be a List A disease under the Plant Quarantine Act 1997 and has re-in​stated the Import Requirement on the import of Citrus plants and plant products (including leaf material and fruit) as well as agricultural equipment and machinery that may have been in contact with the disease.

Find the re-instated​ Import Requirement 31 on the Biosecurity Tasmania website at: www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/plant-biosecurity/plant-import-restrictions​

Citrus canker has been detected in Australia previously and been successfully eradicated.

For more information on citrus canker, signs and symptoms, visit the NSW Department of Primary Industries website at: www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/biosecurity/plant/in​​​​​​sect-pests-and-plant-diseases/citrus-canker​

Furher information can also be obtained at the Outbreak website: www.outbreak.gov.au/current-r​esponses-to-outbreaks/citrus-canker​

If you think you have seen symptoms that look like citrus canker, call the Plant Pest Hotline on ​1800 084 881

(3/5/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Gene technology; Horticulture; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Policy and Legislation; Seeds;


Biosecurity Advisory 6/2018 - Queensland Fruit Fly - Update

The Australian Government has informed the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment that Taiwan has suspended imports of Tasmanian produce following the detection of fruit fly in the State.

Suspension of trade from a country that has specific market access requirements in place was an expected process to be implemented following a pest or disease detection.

The industry has been informed of the notification and the Department would now work closely with them and through the Australian Government to identify the requirements to re-commence movement produce to Taiwan or any other market that may suspend trade.

Trade is continuing to other overseas markets as well as domestic markets that do not have biosecurity requirements in place for Queensland Fruit Fly.

Surveillance operations around the fruit fly larvae detection site at Spreyton have detected an adult fruit fly in traps established around the site.

The current detection sites have not changed and remain as three on Flinders Island and one site near Spreyton in the State’s north west. Control Areas are currently in place around the sites.

Further information is available at http://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/fruitfly

(31/1/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Gene technology; Horticulture; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Seeds;


Biosecurity Advisory 15/2017 - (Re-issued) Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmania (PBMTas): 2018 edition to publish online 13 December 2017

​*Please note that this Advisory is a re-issue to rectify an incorrect link to the Tasmanian Government Gazette website that was contained in Biosecurity Advisory 14/2017

​The 2018 edition of the Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmania (PBMTas) will be published on the Biosecurity Tasmania website (www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity​) on 13 December 2017. The manual will only be published online, and will not be available in hard copy format.

The new edition of the PBMTas includes several minor changes. Please note that these changes take legal effect from the date of public release, which is 13 December 2017.
 
The revised conditions and restrictions in this year’s Manual, include but are not limited to:
  • Flagging the introduction of a new import requirement for Tomato Potato Psyllid (IR46);
  • Minor corrections to entries in Table 2 Import Requirement Summary Table;
  • Range of changes to Biosecurity Tasmania ‘Contacts’ page;
  • Changes in acceptance status of several Interstate Certification Assurances (ICAs) as recognised by Biosecurity Tasmania (see Section 2.18);
  • Removal of a Section 68 Notice for products which may vector Green Snail (Appendix 2.3), as the notice has lapsed and is not being renewed.
In terms of more recent plant biosecurity ‘quarantine pest’ declaration changes, besides a number of pest name taxonomic updates, key changes have included new declarations of Tomato Potato Psyllid, Potato Spindle Tuber Viroid, and many weed species as Regulated Quarantine Pests of concern to the State, and the revocation of Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus to a pest of Non-Quarantine Pest status.

The annual update of Tasmania’s Regulated Quarantine Pests (RQPs - Section 12 List A and B plant pests) was also published in the Government Gazette on Wednesday 22 November 2017. A copy of this Gazette can be accessed on the Tasmanian Government Gazette website.
 
As in previous years the updated RQP List is included in the 2018 edition of the Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmania (PBMTas) in Appendix 1. As a reminder, a Regulated Quarantine Pest (RQP) is a pest which:
  • poses a significant threat to our primary industries and/or natural environment; and is either not present in Tasmania; or present in the State but is under some form of official control program


(11/12/2017)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 11/2017 – Nominations now open for Farm Biosecurity Producer of the Year

If you know an Australian primary prodcuer who takes biosecurity seriously and goes the extra length to avoid diseases, pests and weeds coming on to their property, then nominate them for the 2018 Farm Biosecurity Producer of the Year by 20 October 2017.

Animal Health Australia (AHA) and Plant Health Australia (PHA), through the Farm Biosecurity Program, have partnered with the Australian Government’s Department of Agriculture and Water Resources to deliver the inaugural category specifically for Australian producers as part of the annual Australian Biosecurity Awards.

Whether they work individually or with local, state or federal bodies, producers play a vital role in managing endemic diseases, pests and weeds and are crucial in detecting and containing exotic disease and pest threats. The Farm Biosecurity Producer of the Year Award was established to recognise the contribution of producers who demonstrate outstanding, proactive on-farm biosecurity practices.  Australian primary producers, including individuals and organisations can be nominated. This comprises all forms of Australian farming, including large commercial operations, new and emerging niche industries and hobby-level farmers.

The 2018 Australian Biosecurity Awards will be presented at a gala dinner in Canberra in March 2018.

For information on the awards, including the nomination form, visit agriculture.gov.au/aba and for more information on the Farm Biosecurity Program’s six on-farm biosecurity essentials, visit farmbiosecurity.com.au.

(15/9/2017)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 5/2017 – Barley and grain growers encouraged to remain vigilant for signs of Ramularia leaf spot.

​Biosecurity Tasmania is encouraging barley and other grain growers to remain vigilant for signs of Ramularia leaf spot of barley.

Ramularia leaf spot of barley (Ramularia collo-cygni) hampers leaf development which can lead to loss of green leaf area in crops, and can result in yield loss.  Symptoms include small brown rectangular lesions with yellow margins within the leaf veins, visible from both sides of the leaf but most obvious on the exposed upper leaves after flowering.  Whilst it spreads via spores to nearby hosts, evidence suggests that long distance spread is limited to infected sown seed.

Growers should be on the lookout for barley plants showing these symptoms—but note these can be easily confused with net blotch that is common on other grasses in Australia.  The disease is suited to Tasmania’s cooler climate and it is most common in northern Britain.

Whilst barley is the main host of concern, Ramularia leaf spot has also been reported on oats and wheat so these are potential secondary hosts - although less likely to be impacted by the disease.

Ramularia leaf spot was detected on a small plot near Hagley earlier this year. The detection was immediately responded to with the crop removed and appropriately disposed of, with the site further treated to remove the fungus presence. The site remains under ongoing management and surveillance.

There have been no further detections of the disease at the site or other areas. Surveillance continues to be undertaken and grain growers are encouraged to remain vigilant for signs of Ramularia leaf spot.

Biosecurity Tasmania wishes to acknowledge the assistance of the affected research groups, crop managers and land owners in reporting this disease promptly and in cooperating with the response work thus far.

What to do if you think you have found Ramularia leaf spot of barley

Plant Diagnostic Services in Biosecurity Tasmania (DPIPWE) will test barley samples suspected of being infected with Ramularia leaf spot free of charge. 

Specimens or images can be submitted to a DPIPWE plant pathologist - call 1300 368 550 to be directed to a plant pathologist.  Samples of symptomatic barley leaves should be placed in sealed double plastic bags and sent to:

DPIPWE Plant Diagnostic Services
13 St John’s Avenue
New Town, TAS  7008

Further information, including images of Ramularia leaf spot of barley symptoms can be found on the Biosecurity Tasmania website.

(13/7/2017)
Categories: Cropping; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Policy and Legislation; Seeds;

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