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Tasmanian Biosecurity Advisories

Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment

Latest Advisories

Subscribing to get DPIPWE’s Biosecurity Advisories is the best way you can keep yourself up-to-date and fully informed about Tasmanian biosecurity issues. Our Advisories cover topics such as changes or proposed changes to Tasmania’s import regulations, animal health and welfare, plant health, forthcoming regulation reviews and opportunities for public comment, new or emerging pest/disease risks and a range of other matters related to Tasmania’s biosecurity.


176 advisories found for Natural+environment.
 

Biosecurity Advisory 2/2021 - Tasmania is Queensland fruit fly free – please help us keep it that way!

Tasmania is Queensland fruit fly free – please help us keep it that way! 

Biosecurity Tasmania is asking all Tasmanians to be vigilant for anything unusual in fruit with the summer months being the peak times for fruit fly activity on mainland Australia, and a time of increased risk for Tasmania.

While Biosecurity Tasmania has strict controls in place aimed at reducing the risk of fruit fly entering Tasmania, we ask everybody to remain vigilant for any signs of fruit fly.

Tell-tale signs of fruit fly include live larvae or eggs in the flesh of the fruit or small puncture marks on the skin of the fruit.  Fruit fly larvae look similar to blowfly maggots and could potentially be found in fruit that you purchased, or from fruit grown in your backyard.  

Queensland fruit flies lay eggs in a wide range of fruits and fruiting vegetables.  This list is a guide to potential fruit fly hosts.

Good biosecurity is a shared responsibility. Whilst Biosecurity Tasmania works closely with mainland states to help manage the fruit fly risk and there are increased resources and inspections taking place at the border for imported fruit fly host produce, the risk to Tasmania can never be zero.  Therefore industry, government and the community are encouraged to remain vigilant and work together to help protect Tasmania.

Anyone who notices any signs of fruit fly is asked to put the fruit in a sealed bag or container and place it in the refrigerator and immediately contact Biosecurity Tasmania on 03 6165 3777Please do not dispose of any fruit that has larvae you think might be fruit fly.

More information on Queensland fruit fly is at www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/fruitfly 

(18/1/2021)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 1/2021 – Quarterly summary table of Import Requirement variations

​The Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmania (PBMTas)​ outlines specific Tasmanian import requirements for given plants, plant products or other prescribed matter authorised by the Plant Quarantine Act 1997.

Import Requirement variations may be provided to importers who wish to seek variations to existing Import Requirements.

Variations are provided in the form of Conditional Exemptions where acceptable alternative approaches have been proposed and are assessed as appropriate in terms of managing the biosecurity risk.  The Conditional Exemptions contain strict import conditions which must be met by the importer.

Biosecurity Tasmania now publishes a quarterly table of Import Requirement variations where members of the public can view a summary of variations provided during the last quarter.  The October 2020 to December 2020 summary table can be viewed at: https://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/biosecurity/importing-plants/importers-seeking-variation-of-import-requirements/irv-quarterly-summary​

For further information, individual Import Requirement variation documents can be accessed via links provided within the table on the above webpage.

Please note - currently only applications for variation renewals are being considered. Applications for new Import Requirement variations are not currently being accepted.

For more information contact Biosecurity Tasmania on 03 6165 3777 or email: Biosecurity.Tasmania@dpipwe.tas.gov.au

(6/1/2021)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 29/2020 –– Let’s all stay biosecurity safe this Christmas and New Year

​Biosecurity Tasmania wishes everyone a joyful Christmas and a happy and safe New Year.

It’s been a year like no other. We hope that everyone can look forward to a bright and safe 2021.

Being biosecurity safe has never been more important. Here are some biosecurity basics to remember that will not only help you – but also help Tasmania’s primary industries, our environment and our state’s enviable way of life.


Disposing of those Christmas ham scraps

Remember that if you have pigs, or provide feed to pig farmers, make sure there are no ham or pork scraps (or anything that has been on a plate with a meat product), in the pig’s feed.
  
Protect Tasmania from devastating diseases like African swine fever and Foot and Mouth Disease. See more here: https://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/animal-biosecurity/animal-health/pigs/swill-feeding 


Tasmania is Queensland fruit fly free – please help us keep it that way!

Summer is the peak time for fruit fly activity on mainland Australia and a time of increased risk for Tasmania.

While Biosecurity Tasmania has strict controls in place aimed at reducing the risk of fruit fly getting into Tasmania, we ask everybody to remain vigilant for any signs of the pest.

Fruit fly larvae look similar to blowfly maggots and could potentially be found in fruit that you purchased, or from fruit grown in your backyard.

If you see something suspect and are not sure, please report it to Biosecurity Tasmania on 03 6165 3777. See more here: https://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/fruitfly

 
Have you prepared a bushfire survival plan for your pets and livestock?

With the summer season now upon us, comes the increased risk of bushfires and Biosecurity Tasmania urges animal owners to be well prepared. 

It is important that everyone with animals has at least a basic plan to protect them during a bushfire. 

For more information on animals and bushfire – and how to plan for survival - check out our website at: https://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/animal-biosecurity/animal-welfare/animals-and-bushfire/animals-and-bushfire-planning 


Travellin​g to Tasmania?

Are you planning on travelling to Tasmania soon? Please ensure you apply for, and receive a QR code via the G2G (if you are coming from high or medium risk areas) or Tas e-Travel (if you are travelling from a low risk location) apps BEFORE you arrive.

For more information on Tasmanian border entry requirements visit: https://www.coronavirus.tas.gov.au/ 

Please also take the time to check all your luggage for restricted items before travelling to Tasmania.

DO NOT BRING fruit and vegetables, seafood and some animal products, plant material, soil and seeds.

If you do accidentally bring something – please DISPOSE of it in the amnesty bin when you arrive, or DECLARE it to one of our biosecurity officers.

For more information on Tasmanian biosecurity see this page: http://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/travellersguide 

(23/12/2020)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 28/2020 - Public comments are invited on the import of American bison into Tasmania.

​The Wildlife Management Branch of the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment (DPIPWE) have received a submission for the import of American bison, (Bison bison) into Tasmania.

A risk assessment of the species has been undertaken by DPIPWE and public comments are invited by 31 December 2020.

Details of the species profile and risk assessment is available for viewing on the DPIPWE website at: https://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/wildlife-management/management-of-wildlife/wildlife-imports/american-bison-risk-assessment 

Any enquiries about the risk assessment can be directed to the Wildlife Management Branch: GPO Box 44 HOBART TAS 7001 or Phone: 03 6165 4305 or Email: wildlife.reception@dpipwe.tas.gov.au​

(21/12/2020)
Categories: Gene technology; Invasive Species; Livestock; Natural environment; Pasture; Wildlife; Policy and Legislation;


Biosecurity Advisory 27/2020 - Release of the Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmania 2021 Edition

RELEASE OF THE PLANT BIOSECURITY MANUAL TASMANIA 2021 EDITION

Biosecurity Tasmania advises that the 2021 edition of the Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmania (PBMTas) has been released.

An updated edition of the PBMTas is released each year to help importers, exporters and the broader public understand the current requirements for the import and export of plants, plant products, and other prescribed matter authorised by the Plant Quarantine Act 1997.

The 2021 edition incorporates several changes to import requirements including:

  • Import Requirement 2 – Fruit Fly Host Produce – Disinfestation with Methyl Bromide (regarding new pre-entry conditions for passionfruit)
  • Import Requirement 10 – Grape Phylloxera – Hosts and Vectors (expansion of treatment options for table grapes originating from phylloxera risk zones)
  • Import Requirement 22 - Lupin Anthracnose Disease - Hosts and Vectors (update of the import requirement)
  • Import Requirement 27 - Chickpea Blight - Hosts and Vectors (revision to chickpea blight name)
  • Import Requirement 28 - Blueberry Rust - Hosts and Vectors (improvements to host range citation)
  • Import Requirement 30 - Grain and Grain Products Intended for Animal Feed - Import Conditions (removal of legacy references to maize and modification to definition of TF1 feed grain)
  • Import Requirement 36 - Seeds for Sowing (minor modifications); and
  • Import Requirement 46 – Tomato Potato Psyllid – Hosts and Vectors (amendments excluding dormant nursery stock without green material from regulation against this pest).


Some of the above changes occurred and were advised during 2020 and are now incorporated into the 2021 edition.

Additionally, new pre-entry conditions apply for importers wishing to import mushroom kits for human consumption, along with further clarification on requirements for produce handling in transit (in non-secure conditions) for fruit fly host prescribed matter (Schedule 1B).

A more comprehensive list of all changes can be found in the section 68 notice at the front of the PBMTas 2021 edition.

A PDF version of the PBMTas 2021 edition can be downloaded from here

(16/12/2020)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Natural environment;


Biosecurity Advisory 26/2020 - Bushfire planning for pets and livestock

With the summer season now upon us comes the increased risk of bushfires and Biosecurity Tasmania urges animal owners to be well prepared.

It is important that everyone with animals has at least a basic plan to protect them during a bushfire. 

It is essential that any decision to move your animals is made early – preferably at the first warning of an extreme fire risk. Do not leave that decision until the fire is at hand.

Preparation is the key to survival for you and your animals. If your plan includes an evacuation option for your animals, you need to be equipped and have a destination pre-arranged with family or friends. For instance, for horses, you should have transport for them, and ensure that they are trained to load. 

If livestock are to remain, identify the best paddock to put them in (preferably a bare paddock with a reasonable dam) or open internal gates so they can find the best option at the time. 

All animals need to be identified to their owner. Dogs and cats should be microchipped; but also have names and addresses on their collars. Your name and address should be attached to bird or other small pet cages or carriers. 
Another important action, if you aren’t already registered, is to register your property with a Property Identification Code (PIC). A PIC assists Biosecurity Tasmania to assess the potential impacts in the event of a bushfire or similar natural disaster. For more information and to register your property visit the website: https://pras.biosecurity.tas.gov.au/pras/ui 

More information on animals and bushfire is available on the Biosecurity Tasmania website: https://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/animal-biosecurity/animal-welfare/animals-and-bushfire​  

Talk to your local council as well so you are aware of all the options available in your area.

(10/12/2020)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 25/2020 - Upcoming Changes to Import Requirement 36 - Small Weight Seed Imports

Upcoming Changes to Import Requirement 36 - Small Weight Seed Imports

The Small Weight Seed Import on Arrival Inspection option as an import method in Import Requirement 36 (IR36 – Section b) will cease with the publication of the Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmanian 2021 (on 16 December 2020).  Small weight seed lots refers to seed lots of 1kg or less.

IR36 allows Approved Suppliers and Registered Importers to import small seed lots into Tasmania without a Statement of Seed Analysis. Currently, as an alternative to importing from an Approved Supplier or as a Registered Importer, small weight seed lots can be inspected upon arrival and cleared for entry.

From 16 December 2020, individuals and businesses wishing to import small weight seed lots into Tasmania without a Statement of Seed Analysis will need to be registered on the Approved Suppliers List OR become a Registered Importer OR purchase seed from a Registered Supplier.

If you are ordering seed from a supplier outside of Tasmania and are not a Registered Importer, please first check with your supplier or contact Biosecurity Tasmania to confirm whether they are approved before arranging the shipment.

All businesses and individuals on the Tasmanian Approved Suppliers List and Tasmanian Registered Seed Importers Register have been assigned a registration number. Registration numbers are now required to be recorded on the Notice of Intention (NoI) to Import Grain/Seed form at the time of submission. If you are registered but are unsure of your registration number, please contact Biosecurity Tasmania.

The NoI has been updated to allow recording of the registration number and to reflect weight of seed rather than quantity.

Any imported small seed lots that do not meet the import requirements will be held for potential re-export or destruction.

Current NoI forms are on the Biosecurity Tasmania Website: https://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/biosecurity/biosecurity-forms

For information on becoming an Approved Supplier or Registered Importer please visit the Biosecurity Tasmania website: https://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/plant-biosecurity/small-weight-seed-imports

For more information, contact Biosecurity Tasmania via phone: 03 6165 3777, or email: biosecurity.marketaccess@dpipwe.tas.gov.au

(7/12/2020)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Pasture; Natural environment; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds;


Biosecurity Advisory 22/2020 - Be careful what you send to Tasmania in the mail

Christmas fast approaches. It's timely that you now remind interstate and overseas family and friends that there are certain things that cannot be sent to, or imported into, Tasmania. ​ Broadly, those restricted items include fruit and vegetables, seafood and some animal products, plant products, soil and seeds – but there are more.

To ensure that restricted items do not enter the state via the post, Biosecurity Tasmania uses a range of methods, including detector dogs and x-ray machines, to screen incoming packages.

We encourage everyone to always check what can and can't be mailed, or brought to Tasmania when visiting.  This webpage gives you a quick overview of the types of items that can and cannot be sent. ​ www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/travellersguide

Help your friends and family avoid receiving an infringement notice by asking them to check before they send.

Checking first will help protect our beautiful island from gift wrapped, yet potentially harmful pests and diseases that may hitchhike into Tasmania. Please help us protect Tasmania from introduced pests, weeds and diseases by passing on this important reminder to your interstate and overseas friends and family members.

For more information, visit www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity​, call 03 6165 3777, or email Biosecurity.Tasmania@dpipwe.tas.gov.au

(23/11/2020)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 21/2020 - Release of the 2020-25 National Fruit Fly Strategy

Tasmania has the enviable position of having 'whole of State' freedom from both Queensland fruit fly (Qfly) and Mediterranean fruit fly (Medfly).  This pest free area (PFA) status provides a significant competitive advantage in terms of access to key international markets for Tasmanian producers.

In early November, the National Fruit Fly Council (NFFC) released the 2020-25 National Fruit Fly Strategy (NFFS). 

Building on an earlier draft strategy from 2008, the NFFS was developed as a collaborative effort between the NFFC, Plant Health Australia, Australia's horticultural industries, state governments (including Tasmania), the Australian Government, Hort Innovation and various research institutions. 

This national strategy outlines the actions required to meet the needs of a diverse range of stakeholders across Australia, in priority areas including: market access, management of established fruit fly, prevention, preparedness and response, research, surveillance, diagnostics, communication and engagement, and cooperation.

The NFFC was formed in 2015 to help drive the delivery of a cost-effective and sustainable approach to managing fruit flies across Australia. The Council is tasked with overseeing the implementation of the NFFS and is developing annual implementation plans to identify and monitor key strategic activities.

The release and implementation of the NFFS, together with a sustained, coordinated national approach to fruit fly management, lends strong support to the ongoing efforts aimed at reducing the risks of fruit fly to Tasmania.

A copy of the 2020-25 National Fruit Fly Strategy (NFFS) and 2020-21 implementation plan can be downloaded from: https://preventfruitfly.com.au/national-coordination/national-fruit-fly-strategy/

More information on the National Fruit Fly Council is available here: https://preventfruitfly.com.au/national-coordination/national-fruit-fly-council/

(20/11/2020)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 20/2020 - Australian Food Safety Week (14-21 November 2020)

Australian Food Safety Week​​ starts tomorrow (14 - 21 November 2020), and provides a reminder about the risks of food poisoning and the measures you and your family can take to reduce the risks.

Food poisoning is more than a minor stomach upset, it can be life threatening especially for the elderly, pregnant women and their unborn babies and people with compromised immune systems.

This year Australian Food Safety Week 2020 will be building upon the good consumer behaviour established during the COVID-19 pandemic so we can continue to reduce the amount of foodborne disease.

Continue the good work by following these five simple food safety tips:

  1. CLEAN – wash hands with soap and running water before handling food and between handling raw foods and ready to eat foods, wash up regularly, especially items which have been used for raw meat and poultry, and keep the kitchen surfaces & fridge clean.

  2. CHILL – keep the fridge at 5°C or below, refrigerate any leftovers as soon as they've stopped steaming and use within 2-3 days (or within one day for people at higher risk of foodborne illness including pregnant women, the elderly, and those with compromised immune systems) or freeze them immediately.

  3. COOK – use a thermometer and cook poultry, sausages, minced or stuffed meat dishes to 75°C in the centre; be aware of the risk of raw or minimally cooked egg dishes or look for the new pasteurised eggs. Follow any cooking instructions on the food packaging. Remember, microwave ovens can cook unevenly. Make sure you follow the recommended stirring and standing times before serving.

  4. SEPARATE – prevent cross contamination, especially between raw meat, seafood, fish or poultry and ready to eat foods like cooked meats, desserts and salads.

  5. DON'T COOK FOR OTHERS IF YOU HAVE GASTRO or feel unwell – you could make them sick too – so ask someone else to cook or get a takeaway.

Food Safety – It's in your hands

Learn more about food safety https://foodsafety.asn.au/

(13/11/2020)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;

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