Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content
Tasmania Online

Tasmanian Biosecurity Advisories

Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment

Latest Advisories

Subscribing to get DPIPWE’s Biosecurity Advisories is the best way you can keep yourself up-to-date and fully informed about Tasmanian biosecurity issues. Our Advisories cover topics such as changes or proposed changes to Tasmania’s import regulations, animal health and welfare, plant health, forthcoming regulation reviews and opportunities for public comment, new or emerging pest/disease risks and a range of other matters related to Tasmania’s biosecurity.


96 advisories found for Livestock.
 

Biosecurity Advisory 13/2019 – ​ Applications for Small Grants under the Weeds Action Fund are now open

The Tasmanian Government Weeds Action Fund (WAF) is a ground-breaking fund with a total budget of $5 million over five years to tackle weeds that are impacting on valuable agricultural and environmental assets.

This will ensure we can step up the fight against significant agricultural and environmental weeds, helping farmers, land managers and the community in general to reduce the cost and impact weeds cause.

It has been recently estimated that weeds cost Australian agriculture almost $5 billion annually, including control costs and loss of production.

The funds are to be invested with farmers, Landcare and other community organisations to tackle high priority weeds impacting valuable agricultural and environmental assets.  Weed management is a shared responsibility and the fund aims to support co-investment to deliver practical on-ground works.

Funding of $140,000 for small grants under Stage 1 of the WAF (‘Small Grants’ program) are now open now until 31 July 2019. 
 
Grant eligibility guidelines, assessment criteria and instructions on how to apply can be found on the DPIPWE website at www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/invasive-species/weeds/weeds-action-fund-small-grants   

A further round of grants with updated guidelines will be released in late 2019.

(14/6/2019)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Plant diseases; Pasture; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 11/2019 - Notice of public consultation meetings for the Independent Review of the Queensland Fruit Fly Response

The 2018-2019 Queensland fruit fly (QFF) response was the largest biosecurity response in Tasmania’s history. 

An Independent Review into the Tasmanian QFF incursion and response is currently underway.  The aim of the Review is to consider the lessons learnt to ensure that Tasmania is best placed to manage the risk which QFF poses to our horticultural industries.

As the next stage in the review process, a series of public consultation meetings with the Independent Reviewer have been scheduled as follows:
  • FLINDERS ISLAND – Furneaux Arts and Entertainment Centre (Whitemark), Monday 1 July 2019 (5:30-7:30pm).
  • DEVONPORT – Paranaple Arts Centre – Aberdeen Room (145 Rooke St, Devonport), Tuesday 2 July 2019 (5:30-7:30pm).
  • GEORGE TOWN – George Town Community Centre (39-43 Friend St, George Town), Wednesday 3 July 2019 (5:30-7:30pm).
  • HUONVILLE – Huonville Library – Peach & Plum Room (1 Skinner Drive, Huonville), Thursday 4 July 2019 (5:30-7:30pm).
These meetings are open to all members of industry and the general public.  

Please RSVP by 28 June 2019, indicating your intended venue, by emailing: Fruit.Fly.Consultation@dpipwe.tas.gov.au ​


(11/6/2019)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 4/2019: Tasmania’s final draft of the Biosecurity Bill 2019 is now available for public comment.

​The final draft of Tasmania’s Biosecurity Bill 2019 is now available for public comment. 

The draft Biosecurity Bill provides a simpler and more effective legal framework for the management of disease, weeds and vermin, imports of plant and animal products, and biosecurity emergencies. 

The new draft Bill will facilitate the sharing of responsibility between Government, industry and the community for biosecurity management. It will retain many of the elements of Tasmania’s existing biosecurity system, but in a modernised and consolidated form.

A draft of the Bill has been provided to key stakeholders and has been published on DPIPWE’s website. For more information, go to: https://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/about-biosecurity-tasmania/biosecurity-legislation-review/draft-biosecurity-bill​​

Feedback on the final exposure draft of the Bill can be emailed by 22 February 2019 to biosecuritybill@dpipwe.tas.gov.au​

(31/1/2019)
Categories: Wildlife; Timber imports; Seeds; Policy and Legislation; Plant pests; Plant diseases; Pasture; Natural environment; Marine pests; Livestock; Invasive Species; Horticulture; Gene technology; Freshwater pests; Cropping;


Biosecurity Advisory 30/2018 - Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmania (PBMTas): 2019 edition published 19 December 2018

​The 2019 edition of the Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmania (PBMTas) was published on the Biosecurity Tasmania website (www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity​) on 19 December 2018. The manual will only be published online, and will not be available in hard copy format.

The new edition of the PBMTas includes several changes to important Import Requirements (IR’s). Please note that these changes take legal effect from the date of public release, which is 19 December 2018.
 
The revised conditions and restrictions in this year’s Manual, include but are not limited to:
  • The introduction of new Import Requirements for Tomato Potato Psyllid (IR46), and Citrus Canker (IR31);
  • Revocation of IR25 - Green Snail- Vector Import Controls;
  • Significant amendments to IR1 – Fruit Fly Host Produce – Area Freedom; IR2 – Fruit Fly Host Produce – Disinfestation with Methyl Bromide; IR4 – Fruit Fly Host Produce – Disinfestation of Mango and Papaya with Heat; IR8A – Fruit Fly Host Produce – Post-harvest Treatment with Dimethoate; and IR38 – Nursery Stock;
  • Extensive update to entries in Table 2 Import Requirement Summary Table;
  • Changes in acceptance status of several Interstate Certification Assurances (ICAs) as recognised by Biosecurity Tasmania (see Section 2.18 of the Manual); and
  • Update of Tasmania’s Regulated Quarantine Pest List A & B Pests and Diseases (Appendix 1.1), and Unwanted Quarantine Pests (& Diseases) (Appendix 1.2), including the declaration of.
​In term​s of more recent plant biosecurity ‘quarantine pest’ declaration changes, besides a couple of pest name taxonomic updates, key changes have included new declarations of Citrus Canker as a Regulated Quarantine Pest (RQP), removal of Green Snail as a RQP to an Unwanted Quarantine Pest (UQP), and declaration of Cowpea Mild Mottle Virus and Giant Pine Scale as UQP’s.

The annual update of Tasmania’s Regulated Quarantine Pests (RQPs - Section 12 List A and B plant pests) was also published in the Government Gazette on Wednesday 21 November 2018. A copy of this Gazette can be accessed on the Tasmanian Government Gazette website​.
 
As in previous years the updated RQP List is included in the 2018 edition of the Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmania (PBMTas) in Appendix 1. As a reminder, a Regulated Quarantine Pest (RQP) is a pest which:
  • poses a significant threat to our primary industries and/or natural environment; and is either not present in Tasmania; or present in the State but is under some form of official control program.

(19/12/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife; Freshwater pests; Marine pests; Livestock;


Biosecurity Advisory 23/2018 - Public comment invited on proposal to import Burmese python, Green anaconda and Indian star tortoise into Tasmania

​The Wildlife Management Branch of DPIPWE has received submissions for the Indian star tortoise Geochelone elegans, Green anaconda Eunectes murinus  and Burmese python  Python bivittatus species profiles for consideration to import into Tasmania.  

Public comments are invited by 11 September 2018

Details of the risk assessment are available for viewing on the DPIPWE website at:  

https://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/wildlife-management/management-of-wildlife/wildlife-imports/species-risk-assessments-for-comment

(29/8/2018)
Categories: Invasive Species; Natural environment; Wildlife; Livestock; Policy and Legislation; Freshwater pests;


Biosecurity Advisory 22/2018 - Routine Import Risk Analysis (IRA) for Import Requirement 33 - Silverleaf Whitefly

​Routine Import Risk Analysis (IRA) for Import Requirement 33 - Silverleaf Whitefly
 
This Import Risk Analysis (IRA) has been conducted as part of Biosecurity Tasmania’s plant biosecurity risk analysis  program, where it identifies and reviews pest risks that may present a threat to the State in association with the daily trade of goods, services and movement of people. These IRA reporting processes are consistent with national and international guidelines. This IRA for Import Requirement 33 - Silverleaf Whitefly, also determines whether or not the Import Requirement is technically current.

The draft report can be downloaded here - Import Risk Analyses for Public Consultation

Comments can be provided to  Biosecurity.planthealth@dpipwe.tas.gov.au by  27 September 2018
 
For further detail please contact  - Biosecurity.planthealth@dpipwe.tas.gov.au

(27/8/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Pasture; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation;


Biosecurity Advisory 21/2018 - Routine Import Risk Analysis for Green snail Cantareus apertus (Born 1778)

​Routine Import Risk Analysis for Green snail Cantareus apertus (Born 1778)


This Import Risk Analysis (IRA) has been conducted as part of Biosecurity Tasmania’s plant biosecurity risk analysis program, where it identifies and reviews pest risks that may present a threat to the State in association with the daily trade of goods, services and movement of people. These IRA reporting processes are consistent with national and international guidelines. This IRA for Import Requirement 25 – Green snail, also determines whether or not the Import Requirement is technically current.
 
The draft report can be downloaded from here Import Risk Analyses for Public Consultation

Comments can be provided to  Biosecurity.planthealth@dpipwe.tas.gov.au by  27 September 2018
 
For further detail please contact  - Biosecurity.planthealth@dpipwe.tas.gov.au

(27/8/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Pasture; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation;


Biosecurity Advisory 18/2018 - Import Requirement 46 – Tomato Potato Psyllid Hosts and Vectors

Biosecurity Tasmania wish to advise that Import Requirement 46 relating to hosts and vectors of tomato potato psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli (Šulc) (syn. Trioza cockerelli Šulc)) has been formally declared on 8 June 2018. This import requirement is in response to the detection and establishment of tomato potato psyllid (TPP) ​​​in the Perth metropolitan area, Western Australia, and as a precautionary measure in the event the psyllid is detected in other parts of Australia.

TPP is recognised internationally as a very serious pest of solanaceous hosts like potato, tomato, capsicum and eggplant. The potato processing industry in Tasmania is considered to be a very important agricultural industry sector in the State generating $100 -150 million per annum.

The Import Requirement 46 – Tomato Potato Psyllid Hosts and Vectors is effective from 22 June 2018.


For more information on tomato potato psyllid, visit:

(20/6/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds;


Biosecurity Advisory 16/2018 – Caring for sheep and livestock in extreme weather - Animal welfare alert

Biosecurity Tasmania urges owners of sheep to be vigilant for any signs in their flock of cold stress brought about by forecast cold conditions and heavy rains. Sheep recently shorn and new lambs could be suffering due to the weather conditions and all reasonable precautions should be taken to minimise the effects of cold stress.

Sheep have a natural insulation to extreme weather with their fleece. In cold, wet and windy conditions, sheep shiver, huddle together in the mob and seek shelter behind windbreaks to produce and conserve heat. However, these mechanisms have limits. If weather stress is excessive or prolonged, the sheep's capacity to maintain a stable body temperature may be exceeded and cold stress will result. Hypothermia most commonly occurs in freshly shorn, light condition sheep during wet and windy conditions at any time of the year

Hypothermia literally means 'temperature below normal', occurs when too much body heat is lost or too little body heat is produced, and the result is a drop in body temperature. If weather stress is excessive or prolonged, a sheep's capacity to maintain a stable body temperature may be exceeded, and heat or cold stress will result.

High rainfall and high winds combined with temperatures below normal will cause mortalities in young animals, especially newly shorn sheep without shelter. The impact of the cold weather will depend on its duration, rainfall, wind speed and temperature—the 'wind chill' factor can double heat loss.

Sheep suffering from hypothermia often die as a result of their own behaviour and their attempts to cope. Sheep move in the direction of the wind until they are stopped by a barrier such as a fence, gully or creek. At this point they may pile on top of each other leading to suffocation or drowning. Sheep may be reluctant or unable to move when wet and cold.

Initially sheep will try to maintain their body temperature by:

  • shallow breathing in order to reduce the rate of respiration (that is, rapid respiration or panting causes heat loss)
  • shivering
  • seeking shelter
  • huddling together

If dealing with a small flock, consider applying garbage bags as coats for the sheep. Trials have shown that properly fitted plastic bags can decrease the loss of body heat even in severely hypothermic sheep.

Be prepared to relocate animals to a shed or land on higher ground, or move stock to paddocks with adequate windbreaks with tree or bush shelter in the event of very heavy rainfall or likely flooding.

Prioritise your animals, giving shelter to the most vulnerable such as the ewes and lambs and those newly shorn.

The Bureau of Meteorology have issued a flood watch for low lying / flood susceptible areas on Tasmania's east coast, advising graziers that they should prepare to move stock in expectation of heavy rainfall. Visit the BOM website for more information: http://www.bom.gov.au/jsp/watl/rainfall/pme.jsp

More information on caring for your sheep during cold weather can be found on the DPIPWE/Biosecurity Tasmania website: http://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/animal-biosecurity/animal-welfare/hobby-farmers-and-smallholders/caring-for-sheep-in-cold-weather​​

(9/5/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Natural environment; Pasture; Policy and Legislation; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 13/2018 - Timely reminder about Acute Bovine Liver Disease

​Dairy farmers are being encouraged to be vigilant and informed about an environmental disease that can affect cattle.​

The reminder comes as Biosecurity Tasmania confirmed a case of Acute Bovine Liver Disease (ABLD) on a property in the Derwent Valley. 

Acute Bovine Liver Disease is a toxic disease of the liver of beef and dairy cattle. It occurs sporadically throughout Tasmania with previously recorded cases in the northern midlands, the Derwent Valley and the Copping area. 

ABLD is an environmental disease and is not infectious. Like other photosensitivity conditions, it is believed ABLD is due to a toxin or toxin combination produced by a specific type of pasture fungi. The risk is often not farm-wide but rather associated with specific paddocks or areas within a paddock.

There is no specific treatment for ABLD, however moving the affected cattle away from the pasture where the disease was first observed and providing shade, easy access to water and other supportive treatments assists in recovery which can take many weeks. Deaths from secondary issues are common.

Autumn conditions particularly where there is intermittent warmth and cooling and the odd shower is historically associated with the occurrence of photosensitivity syndromes including ABLD. 

The cause of ABLD is unknown although the presence of rough dog’s tail grass (Cynosurus echinatus) and Drechslera spp. fungi in the pasture system is frequently associated with the disease. 

Biosecurity Tasmania thanks the examining veterinarian and farm manager for their cooperation. 


Further information is also available from the Department’s Livestock Officers by contacting 1300 368 550


(19/3/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Livestock; Natural environment; Pasture; Policy and Legislation;

1 to 10 of 96 news items  Next >>