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Tasmanian Biosecurity Advisories

Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment

Latest Advisories

Subscribing to get DPIPWE’s Biosecurity Advisories is the best way you can keep yourself up-to-date and fully informed about Tasmanian biosecurity issues. Our Advisories cover topics such as changes or proposed changes to Tasmania’s import regulations, animal health and welfare, plant health, forthcoming regulation reviews and opportunities for public comment, new or emerging pest/disease risks and a range of other matters related to Tasmania’s biosecurity.


50 advisories found for Freshwater pests.
 

Biosecurity Advisory 23/2018 - Public comment invited on proposal to import Burmese python, Green anaconda and Indian star tortoise into Tasmania

​The Wildlife Management Branch of DPIPWE has received submissions for the Indian star tortoise Geochelone elegans, Green anaconda Eunectes murinus  and Burmese python  Python bivittatus species profiles for consideration to import into Tasmania.  

Public comments are invited by 11 September 2018

Details of the risk assessment are available for viewing on the DPIPWE website at:  

https://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/wildlife-management/management-of-wildlife/wildlife-imports/species-risk-assessments-for-comment

(29/8/2018)
Categories: Invasive Species; Natural environment; Wildlife; Livestock; Policy and Legislation; Freshwater pests;


Biosecurity Advisory 20/2018 – Soft-shell clam – Fisheries (Biosecurity) Order 2018 No.2

​Following the recent detection of soft-shell clams in Orford, Tasmania and in accordance with Section 270 of the Living Marine Resources Management Act 1995, Fisheries (Biosecurity) Order 2018 No.2 was gazetted today, Wednesday 11 July 2018.

The Order formally prohibits the taking and possession of soft-shell clams in Tasmania by unauthorised persons. The Order has been issued to control and prevent the spread and introduction, or re-introduction of soft-shell clams (Maya Japonica) into areas of State waters. More information on the soft-shell clam is available on the DPIPWE website at: www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/softshellclam

The Order is as follows:

LIVING MARINE RESOURCES MANAGEMENT ACT 1995

Fisheries (Biosecurity) Order 2018 No. 2

Pursuant to the powers under section 270 of the Living Marine Resources Management Act 1995 ("the Act") that were delegated to the Director (Marine Resources) on 2 July 2018 by the Minister acting pursuant to section 20(1) of the Act I make the following order:

1. Short title
This order may be cited as the Fisheries (Biosecurity) Order 2018 No. 2.

2. Specification
This order is made – 
(a) in respect of the harmful pest the soft-shell clam Mya japonica; and 
(b) to place restrictions on the take and possession of that harmful pest to control and prevent the spread and introduction or re-introduction of Maya japonica into areas of State waters.

3. Directions issued
(1) That, unless otherwise authorised, a person must not take Mya japonica in State waters.
(2) That, unless otherwise authorised, an unauthorised person must not possess Mya japonica.

4. Interpretation
In this order –
"unauthorised person" means any person who is not an employee of the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment or the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery undertaking research or biosecurity activities on the soft shell clam Mya japonica.

Dated this 9th day of July 2018

Grant Pullen
A/Director, Marine Resources

INFORMATION
This order issues directions aimed at controlling and preventing the introduction, reintroduction or spread of the introduced harmful pest Mya japonica in State waters.  The order takes effect on the day on which it is published in the Gazette and remains in effect for 12 months.

(11/7/2018)
Categories: Freshwater pests; Invasive Species; Marine pests; Natural environment; Policy and Legislation;


Biosecurity Advisory 17/2018 - Soft-shell clam detected in south east Tasmania

The Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment (DPIPWE) is investigating the detection of the introduced soft-shell clam on a beach on the Prosser River at Orford in south east Tasmania. 

The clam is a large bivalve marine mollusc and genetic sequencing has confirmed it is Mya japonica. Soft-shell clams are native to the Northern Hemisphere, and this is the first detection of soft-shell clam in the Southern Hemisphere.  The response to this detection is being managed in accordance with the National System for the Prevention and Management of Marine Pest Incursions within nationally agreed protocols.

Soft-shell clams can grow up to 150 mm and typically live in sand, mud and gravel in shallow sub-tidal and intertidal zones. The clam exists beneath the sediment surface burying itself up to 50 cm deep. It uses long siphons, which pump water for respiration, feeding and spawning.

Considered an invasive species for their potential to outcompete native species for habitat, Mya japonica represents a potential marine pest risk to other areas of Tasmania and Australia through the spread of larvae on water currents.

Biosecurity Tasmania is currently investigating appropriate surveillance methods to understand the extent of the soft-shell clam incursion and possible response options, including if eradication is feasible or if control methods should be adopted. DPIPWE will pro-actively engage with all biosecurity and scientific groups, the seafood industry, the local councils and communities on this issue to determine the best future strategy.

It is very important that the clams are not collected or moved to other locations.​

Anyone finding what they suspect to be a soft-shell clam are encouraged to contact DPIPWE on telephone at 03 6165 3777 or email: invasivespecies@dpipwe.tas.gov.au

Images of the soft-shell clam can be found on the DPIPWE website at www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/softshellclam

Supplying a photograph of the suspected soft-shell clam would assist in identification.

(19/6/2018)
Categories: Freshwater pests; Invasive Species; Marine pests; Natural environment; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 16/2017 - Public comment invited on proposal to import Sumatran tiger into Tasmania

The Wildlife Management Branch received species profile to facilitate risk assessments for the potential import into Tasmania of;

 Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae)
 
Public comments are invited by 21 December 2017

The Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae) is one of six sub-species of the Tiger (Panthera tigris), all of which are either endangered or critically endangered.  The Sumatran tiger is listed as critically endangered by the IUCN, and is managed in Australia and New Zealand through the Zoo and Aquarium Association (ZAA) Australasian Species Management Program (ASMP). The ZAA program provides the maximum possible support for the conservation of Sumatran tigers in the wild via:
  • An assurance population against extinction in the wild;
  • A potential source population for demographic and/or genetic supplementation in the event of severe decline in the wild;
  • As a source population for research that may benefit the conservation of wild tigers or improve our understanding of the species;
  • As a source population for training activities that may benefit the management of wild tigers (eg, capture techniques that can be applied to conflict tigers);
  • As a charismatic species for exhibition and education programs to increase awareness of human impacts on wildlife and inspire support of conservation activities and actions; and
  • As ambassadors for fund-raising efforts for in situ conservation projects that benefit wild tigers and their habitats.
Through the ZAA ASMP the Sumatran tiger may only be offered to wildlife parks and zoos within Australia and New Zealand that are full accredited ZAA members.

The Sumatran tiger is the smallest of all Tiger species and behaviorally, are generally solitary animals. 

The species profile provided has been submitted by a third party, which is predominately used to undertake the risk assessment. DPIPWE has accepted and published the information contained in the species profile in good faith but accepts no responsibility for its accuracy, nor does DPIPWE accept any responsibility associated with the publishing of this material including, but not limited to, liability associated with copyright.

Risk Assessment:

A risk assessment has been undertaken by specialist staff from the Department including, policy and wildlife officers, ecologists and veterinary officers from Biosecurity Tasmania. 
The risk assessment considers three main areas of risk:
  1. Public safety
  2. Establishment 
  3. Consequence

The risk to public safety is considered highly dangerous in the event that the species escaped captivity.

The likelihood of establishment is considered extremely low due to an inappropriate climate match.

The consequence of establishment is considered moderate because of the low climate match, and the species is not known to be a pest, would not harm property but could harm livestock.

Taking these factors into consideration, the risk assessment concluded that the risk posed by importing Sumatran tiger into Tasmania is serious. 

Mitigation:

Any decision to allow the import of Sumatran tiger into Tasmania would only be considered where:
  • The species is imported by a Wildlife Exhibition Licence holder that has appropriate facilities to securely house the species.
  • The wildlife exhibition facility can clearly demonstrate they have proficient keepers for that particular species.
Standard conditions associated with the import of a serious risk species include, but are not limited to:
  • Import and keeping is only permitted by facilities approved to keep the species under licence.
  • The wildlife facility must meet minimum standards for animal welfare, human safety and security.
  • The animal must not be released, or be allowed to escape from effective control.
  • Animal welfare requirements under the Animal Welfare Act 1993 and any approved Code of Practice or Management Plan must be met.
  • Individuals must be micro-chipped or otherwise identified.
  • The wildlife facility must be available for inspection at any reasonable time.
  • The maximum number of individuals of a species held at the wildlife facility is to be stipulated on the licence, taking into account relevant factors.  Gender may also be stipulated.  
  • Written approval must be sought prior to movement of animals between wildlife facilities and trade of the species under licence.
  • Record keeping and reporting must be provided to DPIPWE as required by DPIPWE. 
  • Collections containing species subject to approval by DPIPWE must accord with the relevant code of practice for keeping that species.

Provided these mitigation measures are in place and continually complied with, the level of risk to Tasmania of holding the Sumatran tiger within a wildlife facility is considered reduced.

Right to Information Act 2009 and confidentiality: 
Please note that submissions will be treated as public documents. By law, information provided to the Government may be provided to an applicant under the provisions of the Right to Information Act 2009

When making your submission, please detail any reasons why you consider the information that you have provided is confidential or should not be publicly released. Your reasons will be taken into account in determining whether or not to release the information.

(11/12/2017)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 15/2017 - (Re-issued) Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmania (PBMTas): 2018 edition to publish online 13 December 2017

​*Please note that this Advisory is a re-issue to rectify an incorrect link to the Tasmanian Government Gazette website that was contained in Biosecurity Advisory 14/2017

​The 2018 edition of the Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmania (PBMTas) will be published on the Biosecurity Tasmania website (www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity​) on 13 December 2017. The manual will only be published online, and will not be available in hard copy format.

The new edition of the PBMTas includes several minor changes. Please note that these changes take legal effect from the date of public release, which is 13 December 2017.
 
The revised conditions and restrictions in this year’s Manual, include but are not limited to:
  • Flagging the introduction of a new import requirement for Tomato Potato Psyllid (IR46);
  • Minor corrections to entries in Table 2 Import Requirement Summary Table;
  • Range of changes to Biosecurity Tasmania ‘Contacts’ page;
  • Changes in acceptance status of several Interstate Certification Assurances (ICAs) as recognised by Biosecurity Tasmania (see Section 2.18);
  • Removal of a Section 68 Notice for products which may vector Green Snail (Appendix 2.3), as the notice has lapsed and is not being renewed.
In terms of more recent plant biosecurity ‘quarantine pest’ declaration changes, besides a number of pest name taxonomic updates, key changes have included new declarations of Tomato Potato Psyllid, Potato Spindle Tuber Viroid, and many weed species as Regulated Quarantine Pests of concern to the State, and the revocation of Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus to a pest of Non-Quarantine Pest status.

The annual update of Tasmania’s Regulated Quarantine Pests (RQPs - Section 12 List A and B plant pests) was also published in the Government Gazette on Wednesday 22 November 2017. A copy of this Gazette can be accessed on the Tasmanian Government Gazette website.
 
As in previous years the updated RQP List is included in the 2018 edition of the Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmania (PBMTas) in Appendix 1. As a reminder, a Regulated Quarantine Pest (RQP) is a pest which:
  • poses a significant threat to our primary industries and/or natural environment; and is either not present in Tasmania; or present in the State but is under some form of official control program


(11/12/2017)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 14/2017 - Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmania (PBMTas): 2018 edition to publish online 13 December 2017

​The 2018 edition of the Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmania (PBMTas) will be published on the Biosecurity Tasmania website (www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity) on 13 December 2017. The manual will only be published online, and will not be available in hard copy format.

The new edition of the PBMTas includes several minor changes. Please note that these changes take legal effect from the date of public release, which is 13 December 2017.
 
The revised conditions and restrictions in this year’s Manual, include but are not limited to:
  • Flagging the introduction of a new import requirement for Tomato Potato Psyllid (IR46);
  • Minor corrections to entries in Table 2 Import Requirement Summary Table;
  • Range of changes to Biosecurity Tasmania ‘Contacts’ page;
  • Changes in acceptance status of several Interstate Certification Assurances (ICAs) as recognised by Biosecurity Tasmania (see Section 2.18);
  • Removal of a Section 68 Notice for products which may vector Green Snail (Appendix 2.3), as the notice has lapsed and is not being renewed.
In terms of more recent plant biosecurity ‘quarantine pest’ declaration changes, besides a number of pest name taxonomic updates, key changes have included new declarations of Tomato Potato Psyllid, Potato Spindle Tuber Viroid, and many weed species as Regulated Quarantine Pests of concern to the State, and the revocation of Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus to a pest of Non-Quarantine Pest status.

The annual update of Tasmania’s Regulated Quarantine Pests (RQPs - Section 12 List A and B plant pests) was also published in the Government Gazette on Wednesday 22 November 2017. A copy of this Gazette can be accessed on the Tasmanian Government Gazette website.
 
As in previous years the updated RQP List is included in the 2018 edition of the Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmania (PBMTas) in Appendix 1. As a reminder, a Regulated Quarantine Pest (RQP) is a pest which:
  • poses a significant threat to our primary industries and/or natural environment; and is either not present in Tasmania; or present in the State but is under some form of official control program

(7/12/2017)
Categories: Horticulture; Seeds; Policy and Legislation; Pasture; Natural environment; Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 11/2017 – Nominations now open for Farm Biosecurity Producer of the Year

If you know an Australian primary prodcuer who takes biosecurity seriously and goes the extra length to avoid diseases, pests and weeds coming on to their property, then nominate them for the 2018 Farm Biosecurity Producer of the Year by 20 October 2017.

Animal Health Australia (AHA) and Plant Health Australia (PHA), through the Farm Biosecurity Program, have partnered with the Australian Government’s Department of Agriculture and Water Resources to deliver the inaugural category specifically for Australian producers as part of the annual Australian Biosecurity Awards.

Whether they work individually or with local, state or federal bodies, producers play a vital role in managing endemic diseases, pests and weeds and are crucial in detecting and containing exotic disease and pest threats. The Farm Biosecurity Producer of the Year Award was established to recognise the contribution of producers who demonstrate outstanding, proactive on-farm biosecurity practices.  Australian primary producers, including individuals and organisations can be nominated. This comprises all forms of Australian farming, including large commercial operations, new and emerging niche industries and hobby-level farmers.

The 2018 Australian Biosecurity Awards will be presented at a gala dinner in Canberra in March 2018.

For information on the awards, including the nomination form, visit agriculture.gov.au/aba and for more information on the Farm Biosecurity Program’s six on-farm biosecurity essentials, visit farmbiosecurity.com.au.

(15/9/2017)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 4/2017 - Biosecurity Bill 2017: public comment invited on draft legislation

Biosecurity Bill 2017: public comment invited on draft legislation

Draft legislation which will provide a sound and flexible framework for the future management of Tasmania’s biosecurity has been released for public comment today (Friday 21 April 2017).

The Biosecurity Bill 2017 seeks to replace seven existing Acts with one piece of framework legislation focussed on all biosecurity matter and the carriers which move it around. The Bill promotes a precautionary approach with the order of priority being to prevent, eliminate and reduce biosecurity risks. 

Enshrining the principle that biosecurity is a shared responsibility, the Bill includes creation of a General Biosecurity Duty to apply to the broader community and businesses and which defines reasonable standards of care and behaviour when dealing with biosecurity risk.

Industries wanting a greater role in formal biosecurity control will be offered partnerships and pathways to do so through accreditation, certification and auditing regimes; and through approved biosecurity programs.

Authorised officers will have new tools to engage with people and businesses creating biosecurity risks, including accepting legally enforceable undertakings that specific action will be taken to prevent, eliminate or minimise a particular biosecurity risk.

Consultation has already occurred on both a position paper and a Future Directions statement leading up to the release of the draft Bill. The consultation draft of the Biosecurity Bill 2017 will be open for formal feedback until 2 June 2017. It is anticipated that a finalised legislative package will be ready for introduction during this Parliamentary year.

A copy of the consultation draft of the Biosecurity Bill 2017, together with plain language fact sheets can be downloaded from the Biosecurity Tasmania website at: dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity/about-biosecurity-tasmania/biosecurity-legislation-review

Comments on the draft Bill should be provided in writing to Biosecurity Tasmania either via email or post by 2 June 2017.


Via post: 
Biosecurity Legislation Project
Biosecurity Tasmania, DPIPWE
GPO Box 44
HOBART TAS 7001

For further information:

Project Manager​​
Biosecurity Legislation Project
Phone: 03 6165 3084

(21/4/2017)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 28/2016 - Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmania (PBMTas): 2017 edition to publish online 14 December 2016

​The 2017 edition of the Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmania (PBMTas) will be published on the Biosecurity Tasmania website (www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity) on 14 December 2016. The manual will only be published online, and will not be available in hard copy format.

Once again the new edition of the PBMTas includes a number of changes. Many changes are minor, but there are a few significant changes in relation to Import Requirement (IR) revocations or additions (newly declared IRs). Please note that these changes take legal effect from the date of public release, which is 14 December 2016.
 
The revised conditions and restrictions in this year’s Manual, include but are not limited to:
  • Revocation of IR8B Fruit Fly Host Produce – Post harvest Treatment with Fenthion;
  • Introduction of a new import standard for nursery stock under BioSecure HACCP program (IR38E). This program has been developed by the Nursery and Garden Industry Australia (NGIA);
  • Revisions to Import Requirements (IRs) for fruit fly host produce treatment options (IR4, 7 & 8A), green snail (IR25), chickpea blight (IR27), treatments for nursery stock (IR38A), and conditions for import of agricultural equipment like grain harvester’s (IR39);
  • Addition of copy of a Section 68 Notice for products which may vector Green Snail (Appendix 2.3);
  • Range of changes to Biosecurity Tasmania ‘Contacts’ page; and
  • Changes in acceptance status of several Interstate Certification Assurances (ICAs) as recognised by Biosecurity Tasmania (see Section 2.18).

In terms of more recent plant biosecurity ‘quarantine pest’ declaration changes, besides a number of pest name taxonomic updates, a key change has been the recent revocation of Little cherry virus 2 to a pest of Non-Quarantine status.

The annual update of Tasmania’s Regulated Quarantine Pests (RQPs - Section 12 List A and B plant pests) was also published in the Government Gazette on Wednesday 30 November 2016. A copy of this Gazette can be accessed on the Tasmanian Government Gazette website​.
 
As in previous years the updated RQP List is included in the 2017 edition of the Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmania (PBMTas) in Appendix 1. As a reminder, a Regulated Quarantine Pest (RQP) is a pest which:
  • poses a significant threat to our primary industries and/or natural environment; and
  • is either not present in Tasmania; or present in the State but is under some form of official control program.

(8/12/2016)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 27/2016 - Biosecurity legislative framework released for public comment

Biosecurity legislative framework released for public comment

A modern biosecurity legislative framework is integral to growing Tasmania's world-class primary industries while protecting our natural environment.

The Tasmanian Government today released Future Direction for a New Contemporary Biosecurity Legislative Framework​  which outlines the elements of a proposed new Biosecurity Act.

This single contemporary Biosecurity Act will replace seven existing Acts and provide an efficient and effective way to regulate biosecurity into the future.

Good biosecurity is about protecting our community, economy, industries and environment from the negative impacts of pest and disease.

Biosecurity is everyone's responsibility and the proposed new legislation reflects this principle.

This new Act is a critical part of ensuring our biosecurity system reflects the 21st century global marketplace with increasing trade and visitors to our state and the changing nature of biosecurity risks to Tasmania.

The Future Directions statement is open for comment until December 23, 2016, and there will also be wide consultation when the draft legislation is released early in 2017. This follows the community consultation process on a Position Paper held earlier this year.

The new Act will replace the Plant Quarantine Act 1997, Animal Health Act 1995, Seeds Act 1985, Weed Management Act 1999, Vermin Control Act 2000, Animal (Brands and Movement) Act 1984, and Animal Farming (Registration) Act 1994.​

You are encouraged to visit Biosecurity Tasmania’s web site​ to read the Future Direction for a New Contemporary Biosecurity Legislative Framework document and provide feedback.​

(8/12/2016)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;

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