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Tasmanian Biosecurity Advisories

Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment

Latest Advisories

Subscribing to get DPIPWE’s Biosecurity Advisories is the best way you can keep yourself up-to-date and fully informed about Tasmanian biosecurity issues. Our Advisories cover topics such as changes or proposed changes to Tasmania’s import regulations, animal health and welfare, plant health, forthcoming regulation reviews and opportunities for public comment, new or emerging pest/disease risks and a range of other matters related to Tasmania’s biosecurity.


159 advisories found for Cropping.
 

Biosecurity Advisory 23/2020 - Amendments to Import Requirement (IR) 22 – Lupin Anthracnose Disease - Hosts and Vectors

​Amendments to Import Requirement (IR) 22 – Lupin Anthracnose Disease - Hosts and Vectors, will come into effect from 14 December 2020.

Import requirements in the Plant Biosecurity Manual Tasmania are reviewed on a regular basis to ensure the regulations remain relevant to current circumstances in trade, and any identified pest risk.
Following an internal review of IR 22, the regulatory changes were declared in a public notice published on 28 September 2020.
Lupin anthracnose (Colletotrichum lupini) is present in almost every country that lupins are grown.

The disease was first detected in commercial crops in Western Australia (WA) in 1996 and is also present in South Australia. The disease has been successfully eradicated from NSW production areas as formally declared in August 2019 (NSW DPI 2019). The disease is not present in Tasmania.

A risk analysis review of the pest has identified that the disease should remain a List A Regulated Quarantine Pest for Tasmania. IR22 has been revised to focus on regulatory measures regarding pest area freedom interstate, and the risk lupin seed presents in trade as a contaminant seed in bulk grain imports.

Lupin anthracnose is an important seedborne disease of lupins, causing major crop damage and yield losses. There are no seed treatments currently available that are 100% effective in eliminating the disease from infected seed, nor are there any pesticide treatment measures currently approved by the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA) for treatment of seed. Consequently, any pesticidal regulatory control options previously held in IR22 are no longer permitted in the new IR.

The revised IR is available on the Biosecurity Tasmania website.

For more information contact Biosecurity Tasmania on 03 6165 3777 or email: Biosecurity.Tasmania@dpipwe,tas.gov.au

(25/11/2020)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation;


Biosecurity Advisory 22/2020 - Be careful what you send to Tasmania in the mail

Christmas fast approaches. It's timely that you now remind interstate and overseas family and friends that there are certain things that cannot be sent to, or imported into, Tasmania. ​ Broadly, those restricted items include fruit and vegetables, seafood and some animal products, plant products, soil and seeds – but there are more.

To ensure that restricted items do not enter the state via the post, Biosecurity Tasmania uses a range of methods, including detector dogs and x-ray machines, to screen incoming packages.

We encourage everyone to always check what can and can't be mailed, or brought to Tasmania when visiting.  This webpage gives you a quick overview of the types of items that can and cannot be sent. ​ www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/travellersguide

Help your friends and family avoid receiving an infringement notice by asking them to check before they send.

Checking first will help protect our beautiful island from gift wrapped, yet potentially harmful pests and diseases that may hitchhike into Tasmania. Please help us protect Tasmania from introduced pests, weeds and diseases by passing on this important reminder to your interstate and overseas friends and family members.

For more information, visit www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity​, call 03 6165 3777, or email Biosecurity.Tasmania@dpipwe.tas.gov.au

(23/11/2020)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 21/2020 - Release of the 2020-25 National Fruit Fly Strategy

Tasmania has the enviable position of having 'whole of State' freedom from both Queensland fruit fly (Qfly) and Mediterranean fruit fly (Medfly).  This pest free area (PFA) status provides a significant competitive advantage in terms of access to key international markets for Tasmanian producers.

In early November, the National Fruit Fly Council (NFFC) released the 2020-25 National Fruit Fly Strategy (NFFS). 

Building on an earlier draft strategy from 2008, the NFFS was developed as a collaborative effort between the NFFC, Plant Health Australia, Australia's horticultural industries, state governments (including Tasmania), the Australian Government, Hort Innovation and various research institutions. 

This national strategy outlines the actions required to meet the needs of a diverse range of stakeholders across Australia, in priority areas including: market access, management of established fruit fly, prevention, preparedness and response, research, surveillance, diagnostics, communication and engagement, and cooperation.

The NFFC was formed in 2015 to help drive the delivery of a cost-effective and sustainable approach to managing fruit flies across Australia. The Council is tasked with overseeing the implementation of the NFFS and is developing annual implementation plans to identify and monitor key strategic activities.

The release and implementation of the NFFS, together with a sustained, coordinated national approach to fruit fly management, lends strong support to the ongoing efforts aimed at reducing the risks of fruit fly to Tasmania.

A copy of the 2020-25 National Fruit Fly Strategy (NFFS) and 2020-21 implementation plan can be downloaded from: https://preventfruitfly.com.au/national-coordination/national-fruit-fly-strategy/

More information on the National Fruit Fly Council is available here: https://preventfruitfly.com.au/national-coordination/national-fruit-fly-council/

(20/11/2020)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 20/2020 - Australian Food Safety Week (14-21 November 2020)

Australian Food Safety Week​​ starts tomorrow (14 - 21 November 2020), and provides a reminder about the risks of food poisoning and the measures you and your family can take to reduce the risks.

Food poisoning is more than a minor stomach upset, it can be life threatening especially for the elderly, pregnant women and their unborn babies and people with compromised immune systems.

This year Australian Food Safety Week 2020 will be building upon the good consumer behaviour established during the COVID-19 pandemic so we can continue to reduce the amount of foodborne disease.

Continue the good work by following these five simple food safety tips:

  1. CLEAN – wash hands with soap and running water before handling food and between handling raw foods and ready to eat foods, wash up regularly, especially items which have been used for raw meat and poultry, and keep the kitchen surfaces & fridge clean.

  2. CHILL – keep the fridge at 5°C or below, refrigerate any leftovers as soon as they've stopped steaming and use within 2-3 days (or within one day for people at higher risk of foodborne illness including pregnant women, the elderly, and those with compromised immune systems) or freeze them immediately.

  3. COOK – use a thermometer and cook poultry, sausages, minced or stuffed meat dishes to 75°C in the centre; be aware of the risk of raw or minimally cooked egg dishes or look for the new pasteurised eggs. Follow any cooking instructions on the food packaging. Remember, microwave ovens can cook unevenly. Make sure you follow the recommended stirring and standing times before serving.

  4. SEPARATE – prevent cross contamination, especially between raw meat, seafood, fish or poultry and ready to eat foods like cooked meats, desserts and salads.

  5. DON'T COOK FOR OTHERS IF YOU HAVE GASTRO or feel unwell – you could make them sick too – so ask someone else to cook or get a takeaway.

Food Safety – It's in your hands

Learn more about food safety https://foodsafety.asn.au/

(13/11/2020)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 19/2020 - Biosecurity Tasmania is calling for volunteers to participate in 2020-2021 ‘Adopt-a-Trap’ Survey

​Biosecurity Tasmania is calling for volunteers from across the state to host insect traps on their properties during November/December 2020 and February/March 2021. 

This survey aims to re-affirm that Tasmania remains free of a range of exotic plant pests such as Tomato-potato psyllid (TPP) (Bactericera cockerelli), carrot psyllids (Bactericera trigonica and Trioza apicallis), African citrus psyllid (Trioza erytreae), Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri),  glassy winged sharpshooter (GWSS) (Homalodisca vitripennis) as well as exotic leaf miners (Liriomyza spp) including;  tomato leaf miner (Liriomyza bryoniae), chickpea leaf miner (Liriomyza cicerina), serpentine leaf miner (Liriomyza huidobrensis), vegetable leaf miner (Liriomyza sativae) and American serpentine leaf miner (Liriomyza trifolii).

These pests and the diseases that they can cause are a serious threat to Australia’s potato, tomato, carrot, viticulture, citrus, stone fruit, tree nut and nursery production industries.   

While Tasmania is currently free from these pests it is important that we remain vigilant.

The Tasmanian information collected from the survey will be combined with data from other participating states. This will provide ongoing evidence that these pests are not established across Australia.

Participants will be provided with a kit and instructions on how to use the traps.

To register or for more information about the survey please visit www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity-tasmania/plant-biosecurity/plant-pest-surveillance/adopt-a-trap-pest-survey

Commercial producers of potatoes, tomatoes and/or other host produce are especially encouraged to participate in the survey.
This is an important project to provide evidence of freedom or early detection of exotic pests in Tasmania and your assistance is greatly appreciated.

(12/11/2020)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation;


Biosecurity Advisory 18/2020 - Launch of national biosecurity digital campaign – Mission: Biosecurity

​Biosecurity Tasmania is proud to be involved in the recent launch of Mission: Biosecurity - a suite of interactive and entertaining digital education and information resources aimed at increasing biosecurity awareness and encouraging all Australians to take practical but effective actions to better manage biosecurity risks in their environment, communities and on their properties.

Video and podcasts featuring the popular Gardening Australia host, Costa Georgiadis, provide fun and informative hints, tips and advice on what can be done at home, work and in our natural environment to better protect our lives and livelihoods from the damaging effects of pests, weeds and diseases – the Biosecurity Baddies!

Mission Biosecurity has a student and classroom focus; however the resources will also have broader appeal to industry and community stakeholders. While the resources have a national focus, many of the materials will have a direct relevance for all Tasmanians as we work together to keep our state biosecurity safe.

Developed by the NSW Department of Primary Industries, in partnership with other Australian state and territories departments of agriculture and primary industries, including Biosecurity Tasmania, Mission Biosecurity represents a unique and coordinated opportunity to bolster a better national understanding of the utmost importance of biosecurity.

Start your Mission: Biosecurity today by visiting www.MissionBiosecurity.com.au

(11/11/2020)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 17/2020 - Community urged to be vigilant for signs of blueberry rust

Biosecurity Tasmania has a containment strategy in place to manage the presence of blueberry rust in the State.  With the weather warming, we need your help with this strategy.

Have you noticed any suspect looking blueberries you have purchased, or have you checked your blueberry plants at home for signs of blueberry rust? Look for signs of brown-rust coloured lesions on the top and yellow-orange pustules on bottom sides of leaves.   Yellow-orange pustules may also appear on the mature fruit.

If you think you may have blueberry rust, please call Biosecurity Tasmania immediately on 03 6165 3777.

Suspect looking fruit should be secured in a zip lock bag, and placed in the refrigerator before calling Biosecurity Tasmania to report the find.

If you do suspect blueberry rust in your plants at home, please do not disturb or move the plants – Biosecurity Tasmania officers will come to you. Care should also be taken to ensure that any clothes or equipment do not become contaminated.

Throughout spring and summer all Tasmanians are encouraged to remain vigilant for any signs of plant pests and diseases.

Good biosecurity is a shared responsibility and we all have an important role to play in helping to protect our industries, environment and way-of-life from the impacts of pests, weeds and diseases.

Further information about blueberry rust, including signs and symptoms, is available on the Biosecurity Tasmania website: dpipwe.tas.gov.au/blueberryrust

(10/11/2020)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 16/2020 - Amendments to Import Requirement 2 - Disinfestation with Methyl Bromide for fruit fly host produce

Amendments to Import Requirement 2 – Disinfestation with Methyl Bromide for fruit fly host produce

Biosecurity Tasmania has made some amendments to Import Requirement 2 – Disinfestation with Methyl Bromide (IR2).
The changes are also being introduced into the Interstate Certification Assurance arrangement ICA-04 Fumigation with Methyl Bromide operational procedure for Victorian and New South Wales accredited businesses.
The amendments came into effect at 12:00am on 30 October 2020.

The amendments include:

  • Passionfruit added to pre-treatment inspections of ‘high risk’ commodities (i.e. in addition to the existing mangoes, stone fruit and chillies) following the recent detection of treated passionfruit containing live fruit fly larvae; and

  • Changes to segregation of commodities during fumigation, with risks managed by other measures.  

Biosecurity Tasmania will only accept certification under ICA-04 protocols that align with the amended IR2.
These measures further strengthen our pre-border biosecurity arrangements to help reduce the risk of fruit fly entering Tasmania.
You can find the amended IR2 on the DPIPWE website.

(5/11/2020)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation;


Biosecurity Advisory 15/2020 - Tasmania is Queensland fruit fly free – please help us keep it that way!

Biosecurity Tasmania is asking all Tasmanians to be vigilant for anything unusual in fruit with the spring and summer months being the peak times for fruit fly activity on mainland Australia and a time of increased risk for Tasmania.

While Biosecurity Tasmania has strict controls in place aimed at reducing the risk of fruit fly getting into Tasmania, we ask everybody to remain vigilant for any signs of fruit fly.​

Tell-tale signs of fruit fly include live larvae or eggs in the flesh of the fruit or small puncture marks on the skin of the fruit.  Fruit fly larvae look similar to blowfly maggots and could potentially be found in fruit that you purchased, or from fruit grown in your backyard.  

Queensland fruit flies lay eggs in a wide range of fruits and fruiting vegetables.  This list is a guide to potential fruit fly hosts.

Good biosecurity is a shared responsibility. Whilst Biosecurity Tasmania works closely with mainland states to help manage the fruit fly risk and there are increased resources and inspections taking place at the border for imported fruit fly host produce, the risk to Tasmania can never be zero.  Therefore industry, government and the community are encouraged to remain vigilant and work together to help protect Tasmania.

Anyone who notices any signs of fruit fly is asked to put the fruit in a sealed bag or container and place it in the refrigerator and contact Biosecurity Tasmania on 03 6165 3777.  Please do not dispose of any fruit that has larvae you think might be fruit fly.

More information on Queensland fruit fly is at www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/fruitfly 

(21/10/2020)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;


Biosecurity Advisory 14/2020 - Protecting your dog, yourself and your family from hydatids

During June and August 2020, three cattle were found to be infected with hydatids at slaughter in Tasmania. All individuals had been imported from mainland Australia, where it was suspected they contracted the infection.

In the 1960s, Tasmania had one of the highest rates of human infection of hydatids in the world. A ban on feeding internal organs (offal) to dogs was introduced. This action and the associated education campaign were successful, and in 1996 Tasmania was declared provisionally free of the disease.

Tasmania remains provisionally free from hydatid disease in dogs and sheep, however, this does not mean Tasmania has eradicated the disease. The hydatid tapeworm is present on mainland Australia in wildlife, feral and domestic animals.
 
Hydatid infections do not generally harm animals, but can cause serious, potentially fatal disease in people. 

Hydatid tapeworm eggs pass out in the faeces of infected dogs and can contaminate pasture. Grazing animals including sheep, goats, cattle and pigs consume these eggs which proceed to develop into cysts in their internal organs (‘offal’). The life cycle is complete when a dog becomes infected from consuming infected offal.

Therefore, ensuring dogs that may acquire hydatids on the mainland are treated properly prior to entry into Tasmania is very important, as they represent a particular risk for spreading hydatids in the State.  This worming treatment must contain praziquantel.  

You can protect your dog, yourself and your family from hydatids by adopting the following measures:
  • Not feeding raw, untreated offal to dogs.  
  • Helping to prevent scavenging through safe disposal of offal (e.g. deep burial with at least 1 metre soil cover, or incineration), muzzling dogs during hunting and stopping dogs from roaming. 
  • Worming dogs regularly, especially before they are used for hunting on someone else’s property.  For further information on worming, please contact your veterinarian.
  • Washing hands thoroughly after contact with dogs and handling livestock carcasses. 
More information on hydatids is available on the Biosecurity Tasmania website

If you suspect hydatid cysts in a carcass, please contact:  AnimalDisease.Enquiries@dpipwe.tas.gov.au or phone 1800 675 888 and collect and submit samples to the Animal Health Laboratory. 

Testing is free. Information regarding sample submission can be found on the Animal Health Laboratory website​


(13/10/2020)
Categories: Cropping; Freshwater pests; Gene technology; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Livestock; Marine pests; Natural environment; Pasture; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Policy and Legislation; Seeds; Timber imports; Wildlife;

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