Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content
Tasmania Online

Tasmanian Biosecurity Advisories

Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment

Latest Advisories

Subscribing to get DPIPWE’s Biosecurity Advisories is the best way you can keep yourself up-to-date and fully informed about Tasmanian biosecurity issues. Our Advisories cover topics such as changes or proposed changes to Tasmania’s import regulations, animal health and welfare, plant health, forthcoming regulation reviews and opportunities for public comment, new or emerging pest/disease risks and a range of other matters related to Tasmania’s biosecurity.


Biosecurity Advisory 9/2018 - Queensland Fruit Fly Update

​Control, surveillance and eradication activities are continuing at and around three sites on Flinders Island and one site near Spreyton in north west Tasmania where fruit fly larvae were detected in apricots grown in backyard gardens last month.

At this stage no further larvae have been detected at sites outside the four already confirmed.

As part of surveillance operations, trap sites have been established around a 1.5km radius from the four sites where larvae were detected. These are in addition to already established surveillance traps used as part of Tasmania’s fruit fly free monitoring.

Since the original detection in January, monitoring of all the surveillance sites has identified a total of 18 adult fruit flies within the control areas that have been established around the sites on Flinders Island and near Spreyton.

This total consists of 1 male fruit fly previously detected near the Spreyton site, and yesterday two further male fruit flies were detected in surveillance traps inside the Control area.

On Flinders Island a total of 15 adult fruit flies have been detected since the original larvae detection on the island.   

The detections of further adults does not change the response already in place within the control area at this stage.

An established surveillance, control and eradication program is in place within the control area that has been identified.

These detections highlight the importance of the response and measures in place. It gives Biosecurity Tasmania the information to know that while we are detecting adults we must continue to target these areas.  Biosecurity Tasmania will be intensifying trapping around this site as part of ensuring that we do identify and eradicate any active fruit fly within these areas.   

If any changes are required to the response measures in place industry and the community will be kept informed.

Fruit fly traps maintained as part of an ongoing Statewide surveillance program have not detected any adult flies outside the current control areas.

The importance of the work underway has been greatly supported by an incredibly vigilant industry and general community and we are encouraging everyone to continue to remain vigilant and assist in the work underway. The fruit fly report number is 6165 3774

We are continuing to work closely with Fruit Growers Tasmania as part of keeping industry informed and identifying how we can continue to support them.

Further information about fruit fly can be found at www.dpipwe.tas.gov.au/fruitfly

(7/2/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Policy and Legislation;


Biosecurity Advisory 8/2018 - Queensland Fruit Fly - Update

Fruit Fly Detection – Update – 2 February 2018
Changes to Control Area restrictions in Spreyton
Biosecurity Tasmania has changed requirements for the movement of fruit fly host produce from within the Spreyton Control Area to the rest of Tasmania.
Only host fruit and vegetables that have been treated to an appropriate standard are to be moved from within the Control Area to outside the Control Area in Tasmania. Other changes include:
•    Roadside checks for host produce at Control Area exit points
•    Improved disposal options for commercial growers
•    Provision of treatment options consistent with the treatment protocols for all fruit imported into Tasmania.

Industry representatives have been briefed about the new requirements.

New detection on Flinders Island
Biosecurity Tasmania’s surveillance operations on Flinders Island have detected suspected a single suspected adult female fruit fly trapped within 200 metres of the first detection site at Lady Barron.
Control Areas are currently in place across the Furneaux Group of Islands, Including Flinders Island.

Further information about Fruit fly can be found on the DPIPWE website http://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/fruitfly

(2/2/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Policy and Legislation;


Biosecurity Advisory 7/2018 - Queensland Fruit Fly - Update correction

Correction: The suspension of imports to Taiwan applies only to Tasmanian host fruit.

The Australian Government has informed the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment that Taiwan has suspended imports of Tasmanian host fruit following the detection of fruit fly in the State.
Suspension of trade from a country that has specific market access requirements in place was an expected process to be implemented following a pest or disease detection.
The industry has been informed of the notification and the Department would now work closely with them and through the Australian Government to identify the requirements to re-commence movements to Taiwan or any other market that may suspend trade.
Trade is continuing to other overseas markets as well as domestic markets that do not have biosecurity requirements in place for Queensland Fruit Fly.
Surveillance operations around the fruit fly larvae detection site at Spreyton have detected an adult fruit fly in traps established around the site.
The current detection sites have not changed and remain as three on Flinders Island and one site near Spreyton in the State’s north west. Control Areas are currently in place around the sites.
Further information is available at http://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/fruitfly

(31/1/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Policy and Legislation;


Biosecurity Advisory 6/2018 - Queensland Fruit Fly - Update

The Australian Government has informed the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment that Taiwan has suspended imports of Tasmanian produce following the detection of fruit fly in the State.

Suspension of trade from a country that has specific market access requirements in place was an expected process to be implemented following a pest or disease detection.

The industry has been informed of the notification and the Department would now work closely with them and through the Australian Government to identify the requirements to re-commence movement produce to Taiwan or any other market that may suspend trade.

Trade is continuing to other overseas markets as well as domestic markets that do not have biosecurity requirements in place for Queensland Fruit Fly.

Surveillance operations around the fruit fly larvae detection site at Spreyton have detected an adult fruit fly in traps established around the site.

The current detection sites have not changed and remain as three on Flinders Island and one site near Spreyton in the State’s north west. Control Areas are currently in place around the sites.

Further information is available at http://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/fruitfly

(31/1/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Policy and Legislation;


Biosecurity Advisory 5/2018 - Queensland Fruit Fly - Update

​Flinders Island Fruit Fly Update

Surveillance operations around the current fruit fly detection sites have detected five adult fruit flies in traps established around one of the infected sites on Flinders Island.

The adult male flies were detected within a 200m zone put in place around the site where larvae was originally detected.

The suspect adult detections are in an area already being targeted in the fruit fly response and has not increased the size of the area being targeted.

No further new sites had been identified outside of the current three sites on Flinders and one site near Spreyton in north west Tasmania.

Three flies were detected on the already identified Flinders Island property and two flies were detected on adjacent properties.

The flies have been sent for further testing.

(29/1/2018)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Policy and Legislation;

1 to 5 of 115 news items  Next >>