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Tasmanian Biosecurity Advisories

Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment

Latest Advisories

Subscribing to get DPIPWE’s Biosecurity Advisories is the best way you can keep yourself up-to-date and fully informed about Tasmanian biosecurity issues. Our Advisories cover topics such as changes or proposed changes to Tasmania’s import regulations, animal health and welfare, plant health, forthcoming regulation reviews and opportunities for public comment, new or emerging pest/disease risks and a range of other matters related to Tasmania’s biosecurity.


Biosecurity Advisory 20/2016 - Recommencement of restricted Strawberry fruit trade from Western Australia

Recommencement of Restricted Strawberry Fruit Trade from Western Australia
Biosecurity Tasmania advises that new, temporary import requirements have been imposed on the trade of Western Australian strawberry fruit as a vector of Green Snail (Cornu apertus (Born) (syn. Cantareus apertus (Born), Helix aperta (Born)).  

As a result, strawberries from properties more than two kilometres from a Green Snail infestation in Western Australia can once again be imported into Tasmania in accordance with a series of import conditions, including that properties must be inspected free of the pest by an approved person on a monthly basis.  Strawberry fruit from Western Australian properties within two kilometres of a Green Snail infestation will still not be accepted for the time being.

Biosecurity Tasmania continues to work with our Western Australian counterparts on this matter.

For any further enquiries, please contact Biosecurity Tasmania directly on (03) 6165 3777.

We ask everyone to please remain vigilant for the presence of any Green Snails when purchasing strawberry punnets from Western Australia and immediately report any snail finds to Biosecurity Tasmania. Please do not release the snails into the waste stream or environment.

(15/8/2016)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Natural environment; Policy and Legislation;


Biosecurity Advisory 19/2016 - Blueberry rust detection

​Blueberry Rust detection
Biosecurity Tasmania and industry are responding to a detection of blueberry rust on a property in the State’s north.
A commercial grower notified Biosecurity Tasmania of the suspect plants earlier this week and testing by DPIPWE’s Plant Health Laboratories has confirmed the disease in six of 11 samples from the site.
The grower is working with Biosecurity Tasmania and has put measures in place to reduce the risk of further movement of the plant fungal disease.
A systematic survey of the property to identify where the disease is present is also being undertaken.
As part of the response a range of quarantine and hygiene measures have been identified and implemented with the grower to reduce the risk of further movement of the disease.
Biosecurity Tasmania will also be undertaking surveillance on properties outside of this site to determine if it is present on other properties with blueberry plants within a 20 kilometre radius.
Undertaking that surveillance and understanding the presence of blueberry rust is a critical first step to identify the next management actions required to respond to the disease.
At this stage the cause of the detection had not been identified but Biosecurity Tasmania will work with the grower to see if the source can be identified.
DPIPWE also has notified interstate plant health authorities to ensure they are aware of the presence of the disease in the State.
Anyone with blueberry plants is encouraged to remain vigilant for evidence of the disease and report any unusual signs on blueberry plants to Biosecurity Tasmania on 1800 084 881.

Further information about blueberry rust can be found on the DPIPWE website http://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity/plant-biosecurity/pests-and-diseases/blueberry-rust

(12/8/2016)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Invasive Species;


Biosecurity Advisory 18/2016 - WA strawberry imports halted

All imports of Western Australian strawberries to Tasmania have been halted due to the risk of Green snail incursion.

The pest has been identified in a total of three punnets of strawberries purchased in different retail outlets in Tasmania.

All of the fruit originated in Western Australia.

Biosecurity Tasmania thanks the public for its vigilance and asks that people who have strawberries from Western Australia at home to check the product carefully and contact Biosecurity Tasmania on 03 6165 3777 if they find a snail on the product.

Green snail is classified as a high priority pest and there is a national protocol in place for reducing the risk of its movement outside the confirmed area of establishment for the pest.

Green snail is native to Southern Europe and North Africa but has been established in the Perth metropolitan area since the 1980s and also has been detected elsewhere in Australia.Mature green snails have an olive-green shell and white flesh. They are intermediate in size and rarely exceed 25mm in shell diameter.

 

(4/8/2016)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Natural environment; Pasture;


Biosecurity Advisory 17/2016 - Green snail detection

​Biosecurity Tasmania has halted strawberries from two Western Australian growers entering Tasmania after the detection of an exotic pest in two punnets on 2 August 2016.
Two separate reports were received from customers who found snails (later identified as Green snail) in punnets of strawberries purchased in different supermarkets in the north and south of the State.
Traceback so far has isolated the pest detections to two growers in Western Australia. Further product from those growers has been stopped from entering the State
Biosecurity Tasmania has worked with the supermarkets which acted quickly to remove those growers’ products from shelves. Further measures will be put in place on product from other Western Australian growers as well to reduce the risk of further incursions.
People who may have strawberries from Western Australia at home are asked to check the product carefully and contact Biosecurity Tasmania if they find a snail on the product.
The detection highlights the importance of all sectors - from growers, to suppliers, supermarkets and customers - being informed and engaged and working with Biosecurity Tasmania to help protect our State from the threat of pests and disease.
BT is liaising with its counterpart in Western Australia to investigate how the snails came to be in the product.
Green snail is classified as a high priority pest and there is a national protocol in place for reducing the risk of its movement outside the confirmed area of establishment for the pest.
Green snail is native to Southern Europe and North Africa but has been established in the Perth metropolitan area since the 1980s and also has been detected elsewhere in Australia. Good information to identify Green snail is available at the Victorian DPI site.
Mature green snails have an olive-green shell and white flesh. They are intermediate in size and rarely exceed 25mm in shell diameter.
Members of the public can contact Biosecurity Tasmania on 03 6165 3777.  

(3/8/2016)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Invasive Species; Natural environment; Pasture;


Biosecurity Advisory 16/2016 - Tasmania’s area freedom from blueberry rust recognised in major markets

​Tasmania’s area freedom from blueberry rust recognised in major markets.

Tasmanian blueberry growers can resume unrestricted trade with their largest interstate market following the success of the blueberry rust eradication program.

The disease was first detected in Tasmania by Biosecurity Officers during a routine freight inspection in September 2014 in a consignment of blueberry plants imported from Victoria. 

The detection prompted a response operation led by Biosecurity Tasmania to eradicate blueberry rust from the State. By March 2015, the disease was identified in plants on a total of 54 properties, the great majority being residential gardens.

The active phase of the response involved a widespread public awareness campaign which prompted nearly 130 public reports for investigation. More than 100,000 blueberry plants were closely inspected.

All infected premises had host plants removed and destroyed.

Access to interstate markets for Tasmanian blueberries was lost immediately after the detection. However, Biosecurity Tasmania was able to negotiate a property-level blueberry rust freedom accreditation scheme for growers wishing to export to specified interstate markets. These were used by growers who had surveillance completed on their properties to send fruit to Victoria and Western Australia.

Victoria has now accepted that the Tasmanian response has succeeded in eradicating blueberry rust from the State with no evidence of the disease despite intensive surveillance in the intervening period.

There now are no specific blueberry rust-related restrictions on trade in the plant and its fruit between Tasmania and Victoria.

The overwhelming market for blueberries is either within Victoria or with fruit transhipped through Victoria to SA or the eastern seaboard.

Western Australia is a much smaller but nevertheless useful market for our blueberries. It also is expected to respond in the near future to Tasmania’s claim for reinstatement of area freedom status.

Further information on blueberry rust can be found on the DPIPWE/Biosecurity Tasmania website: http://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/biosecurity/plant-biosecurity/pests-and-diseases/blueberry-rust​

(14/7/2016)
Categories: Cropping; Horticulture; Natural environment; Policy and Legislation; Invasive Species;

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